first day on new allotment..

This is the place to discuss not just allotments but all general gardening problems and queries which don't fit into the specific categories below.
(formerly allotments and tips, hints and problems)
grahoom
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 149
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 2:00 pm
Location: west sussex

first day on new allotment..

Post: # 21632Post grahoom »

hello.

a friend of mine has an allotment, and was finding a little too much to keep, so i've started sharing it with him and his girlfriend.

was great up there, very over grown, but much fun cutting down nettles, grass, and brambles to clear pathway between the beds.

can tell next few months is gonna be hard work, but a lot of fun.

next time i go up will take my digital camera.
|You can't feel lonely with nature as your companion| millican dalton

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 8114
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Post: # 21686Post ina »

Great - I think it's best if you are sharing an allottment with somebody - gives you all more of an incentive to carry on, even in bad conditions - more fun all round!
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

User avatar
Millymollymandy
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 17637
Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 6:09 am
Location: Brittany, France

Post: # 21701Post Millymollymandy »

You'll also have someone to share the glut of lettuce with! Good luck with the lottie. :mrgreen:

Wombat
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5918
Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2004 8:23 pm
Location: Sydney Australia
Contact:

Post: # 21801Post Wombat »

That's great mate! I hope it goes well.

Just get your self a tube of DeepHeat!

Nev
Garden shed technology rules! - Muddypause


Our website on living more sustainably in the suburbs! - http://www.underthechokotree.com/

grahoom
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 149
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 2:00 pm
Location: west sussex

Post: # 22056Post grahoom »

so had two good times up there, digging one of the plots that is ready for use, and cutting back a lot of stingers and grass from the other plot...

the allotment is on the top of the biggest hill in brighton, and i live at the bottom - so its all good exercise ,cycling up there then doing some work! - should get myself fit no end.

now what i am thinking, and wondering, is if a patch is heavily overgrown, would it be best for me, once i have cut it down, to then cover it with carpet / or tarps etc to stop the sun getting to it and allow it to die back?
|You can't feel lonely with nature as your companion| millican dalton

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 8114
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Post: # 22058Post ina »

grahoom wrote:now what i am thinking, and wondering, is if a patch is heavily overgrown, would it be best for me, once i have cut it down, to then cover it with carpet / or tarps etc to stop the sun getting to it and allow it to die back?
That's what I would do if you are not going to use it in the near future.
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

grahoom
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 149
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 2:00 pm
Location: west sussex

Post: # 22061Post grahoom »

cheers ina, we have a third of the allotment ready for planting etc..

if i did want to use the bit that i am clearing, would it be better for me to use a rotovator (i don't really like the idea of using one...) or would it be better for me to actually do the hard work of digging it by hand, and turn the soil so that the cut down stuff is covered with the underlying earth i've dug (if that makes any sense at all, but i know what i mean!!! ) :?
|You can't feel lonely with nature as your companion| millican dalton

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 8114
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Post: # 22066Post ina »

Personally, I would prefer to dig it - I always think if you rotovate it, it just cuts up the roots and, depending on what type of weeds you've got there, it might multiply them rather than get rid of them... Also, if you are digging, you can stop and pick up roots and remove them instead of chopping them and leaving them around.

Depends on how many acres you've got to dig, of course!
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

Tigerhair
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 808
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2006 5:27 pm
Location: Derbyshire

Post: # 22093Post Tigerhair »

Hi - we turned a part of the garden into the veggie patch this year most of it was grass and we rotavated the lot - around the part where it was a bed for shrubs, the ground elder has come back, so if you have a part with perennial weeds it's much better to do what Ina suggests and dig and thoroughly remove all traces of them... Otherwise, if you're in a rush (and maybe you're not if you're not going to use the ground this year) you could rotavate.... better on the environment if you don't though!?

Shall I stop waffling now?!
Tigz x

grahoom
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 149
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 2:00 pm
Location: west sussex

Post: # 22104Post grahoom »

Tigerhair wrote:better on the environment if you don't though!?

Shall I stop waffling now?!
yeah good point, i was thinking that today when i was up there. i'd prefer to do as much by hand, and well, there is no rush really.

i'll be up there friday on my day off - might take the digi-cam.

thanks for the advice !
|You can't feel lonely with nature as your companion| millican dalton

User avatar
Millymollymandy
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 17637
Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 6:09 am
Location: Brittany, France

Post: # 22135Post Millymollymandy »

Beware of some creeping grasses if you rotavate them. I reckon they are like bindweed and every little bit of root will make a new plant. :(

Also beware of chafer grubs lurking under turf - better to dig it by hand and pick the little beggars out or they will have great fun with your veg roots!

Camile
Living the good life
Living the good life
Posts: 293
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2006 11:16 am
Location: North East Co. Galway - Ireland

Post: # 22136Post Camile »

Hi everyone ..

When I dug up my patch the other day (well bits by bits) .. I actually burried the turf layer .. deep down under at least 50 cm of good soil ... cutting as much as I could from it ... by hand of course . but it's not acres of veggie patch .. and when one part is dug and seeded .. just moved onto the next one..

I heard it's supposed to be effective because the weeds and all get no sunshine, so they rot down and fertilises the bed.

So would that work or am I just going to have a nightmare weeding the thing in a few days/weeks ?

Camile

User avatar
Millymollymandy
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 17637
Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 6:09 am
Location: Brittany, France

Post: # 22180Post Millymollymandy »

Theoretically that should work, but again, be warned of creeping type grasses, because they will still come through. I have forbidden my husband from doing that in my garden ever again!

Camile
Living the good life
Living the good life
Posts: 293
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2006 11:16 am
Location: North East Co. Galway - Ireland

Post: # 22181Post Camile »

So if I understand well M3 ..

it's YOUR garden but your husband does all the hard work ! fair play to you !

User avatar
Millymollymandy
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 17637
Joined: Tue May 10, 2005 6:09 am
Location: Brittany, France

Post: # 22190Post Millymollymandy »

But of course!!! He's shifting a newly delivered corde of wood right now. Whilst I'm playing on the computer!! :mrgreen:

Post Reply