Compost worms

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Odsox
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Compost worms

Post: #288802 Odsox
Sat Jan 21, 2017 12:50 pm

Where do compost worms come from, anybody know ?
I'm talking about the Tiger Worms that you get in your compost bins. I've never come across Tiger Worms in the soil except when I've just spread compost and digging it in.
But .. last year I foolishly bought one of those rotary composters (foolishly as it doesn't work as easily as the make out) and today I opened it and stirred the contents, only to find Tiger Worms.
Now, this composter is off the ground by about 9", so where did the worms come from ?
Before you ask, the contents were pure grass mowings and shredded newspaper.
Tony

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diggernotdreamer
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288806 diggernotdreamer
Sat Jan 21, 2017 7:23 pm

These worms, brandlings, Tiger Worms or their latin name Eisnenia Foetida don't actually live in soil, they spend their time in leaf litter, decaying vegetable matter and manure. It is possible that the eggs were in your grass lurking under some leaves or old mulch and when you put your mowings into the tumbler, you picked up the eggs with the mowings and the worms hatched out. I read somewhere a long time ago, eggs can be present on vegetables waiting for an opportune moment to hatch, if you look under flower pots, you always find some underneath

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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288807 Skippy
Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:38 pm

Odsox wrote:Where do compost worms come from, anybody know ?


Well when a mommy worm and a daddy worm love each other........

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Odsox
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288810 Odsox
Sun Jan 22, 2017 9:48 am

Skippy wrote:
Odsox wrote:Where do compost worms come from, anybody know ?


Well when a mommy worm and a daddy worm love each other........


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Tony

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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288811 Green Aura
Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:33 am

I was going to suggest eggs in your source material and then it occurred to me that I have absolutely no idea how worms reproduce!
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Odsox
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288814 Odsox
Sun Jan 22, 2017 11:03 am

Thanks for that DnD, that makes perfect sense if they lay there eggs on leaf litter etc.

But now I have another question, if I try to make compost with pure grass mowings instead of 50% brown added I get a slimy wet goo.
Yesterday I mowed the lawn for the first time since November and I'm ashamed to say that I didn't clean the mower last time. When I started it up it threw large chunks of brown stuff out from underneath, which turned out to be perfectly composted grass.
Any idea of the mechanism behind that ?
The only thing I can think is that no heat was involved, so it must have been aerobic. But it only took 2 cold months to totally break down the grass into a dry powdery compost.
Now if I could only manage to do that in bulk I'd be happy as a pig in whatsit.
Tony

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diggernotdreamer
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288818 diggernotdreamer
Sun Jan 22, 2017 5:55 pm

I guess that the conditions were just right for the grass to dry under the mower, it didn't get wet again, there was some kind of air flow which allowed it to dry out, bit like when they find mummified body's in the loft, the right combination of slow decompostion and air flow. Inside a tumbler, there is no airflow, it starts to sweat and there is nowhere for the moisture to transpire, which is why you need the paper to take up the moisture. A few months back, I put paper on top of some beds and covered with the last of the grass mowings to keep the weeds down, it is now perfectly brown dried grass

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Odsox
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288820 Odsox
Sun Jan 22, 2017 6:19 pm

Mmm, well conditions were obviously just right, but I wish I knew what those conditions were.
If there's no airflow you get sludge, if you have airflow you get hay.
This was perfectly crumbly compost, unrecognisable as grass.

Mind you, if you have no airflow but with fermentation you get silage, so there's more than one way to deal with mown grass. As I get vast amounts of grass mowings from now onwards, perhaps some experimentation is in order
Tony

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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288828 Weedo
Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:44 pm

They don't care! daddy is mommy and mommy is daddy but they really get twisted when they get together.

Odsox - the reason your grass goes to goo is simply that it is 80 -90% water with only a little mechanical tissue to hold it up, if it was then out in the rain it added to the problem. If you can get aeration (regular turning) in cool composting you will get a usable product, If you can get fermentation you will get silage but not compost (if you know a helpful farmer who makes silage try to grab a handful and use in the same way as a yeast culture) and will still need to go through the turning process with aeration. Old hay and silage bales left out in the stack for a couple of years (yes, I do store my hay in uncovered stacks in the open air) do begin to turn into a great compost fairly quickly.

Under your mower was dry but the grass was compacted, natural bacteria and fungi obviously had the right conditions.
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Re: Compost worms

Post: #288831 diggernotdreamer
Sun Jan 22, 2017 11:50 pm

[quote="Odsox"]Mmm,
This was perfectly crumbly compost, unrecognisable as grass.

Oh, I understand now, maybe our friends the little compost worms had something to do with this, when my teabags go through the worms (I have a worm bin and they live on tea bags) they produce dark compost, so maybe the grass attracted some worms there and they converted it to worm casts,


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