Vertical gardening

This is the place to discuss not just allotments but all general gardening problems and queries which don't fit into the specific categories below.
(formerly allotments and tips, hints and problems)
Post Reply
User avatar
MKG
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5134
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 5:15 pm
Location: North Notts.

Vertical gardening

Post: # 290350Post MKG
Thu Dec 14, 2017 2:11 pm

No, not the plants - me.
As my joints have deteriorated (that's hard for one so young as me) (???!!?) my garden activities have had to change. I can still get the apples, pears, plums and damsons from the orchard because they're in the general direction of UP. I can no longer get the lettuces, spuds, cabbages - that kind of thing - from the garden because they're in the general direction of (this is going to surprise you) DOWN. I have a decent quantity of rhubarbs which, although they're DOWN, can be pulled with only a slight bow in their direction. I have all the winemaking ingredients I can handle, thank you very much, although I'll miss the elderberry and sloe expeditions.
The garden has been adjusted to suit. But now I have two greenhouses (unheated) to take into account. They're not huge - I have a little one (don't giggle) and a big one (same applies). For the past two years, they've been mainly occupied by chillis, but it's becoming apparent that I can easily produce more chillis than even a chilli maniac could use (my freezer has a lot of chillis in it). Being a hater of wasted space and having become totally saturated with tomatoes, I've tried other things to prevent TCO (Total Chilli Overload). I've grown melons - very successful and extremely tasty but they all ripened at the same time - and no, melons are very difficult to turn into a wine worth drinking. I've grown aubergines, but I'm afraid I had to award them the top prize in the Most Boring category. I've been banned from growing "not more bloody" tomatoes (sorry, Odsox).
What shall I grow? The design spec. says "tasty, useful, non-glutting and no you will not make even more wine!!".
HELP!!
The secret of life is to aim below the head (With thanks to MMM)

User avatar
Green Aura
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 8720
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:16 pm
latitude: 58.569279
longitude: -4.762620
Location: North West Highlands

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290352Post Green Aura
Thu Dec 14, 2017 5:20 pm

A couple of lemon trees and a grapevine (purely for eating purposes obviously :wink: ) for starters. Ginger, turmeric and some lemongrass (they're to go with the chillies). Raised bed for year round salad leaves.

A butternut squash, growing up a frame - and I wouldn't give entirely on the melons - they make fantastic sorbet, or frozen in slices make splendid lollies (skin on for holding). Maybe there are varieties that aren't aimed at commercial growers and ripen in succession.
Maggie

Never doubt that you can change history. You already have. Marge Piercy

Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. Anais Nin

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 7782
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290353Post ina
Thu Dec 14, 2017 8:39 pm

Climbing french beans and cucumber also grow nicely upwards, and in the greenhouse in our climate...
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

User avatar
Flo
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 1722
Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 10:12 am
Location: Northumberland

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290362Post Flo
Fri Dec 15, 2017 10:42 am

Runner beans grow up. Try http://www.realseeds.co.uk/peas.html for Telephone Peas which are climbers and I've heard good words of those. You can try French beans, climbing varieties – try ‘Cherokee trail of tears’ also from Real Seeds which I've heard good words about. You could also do a search through the Real Seeds Catalogue for their Trombino courgette seeds - these are apparently good climbers.

User avatar
Odsox
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5153
Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 2:21 pm
Location: West Cork, Ireland

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290365Post Odsox
Fri Dec 15, 2017 11:52 am

All good replies, but am I missing the point?
If you can't bend or kneel, then how are you going to sow or plant these fruit and veg plants, as well as train them upwards until they are at an appropriate height?

I would suggest that (depending on your greenhouse(s)) that you make a permanent staging all the way round and grow things at waist height, rather similar to my big greenhouse. Ignore the hydro tubes, the bit in between is what I alluding to. http://selfsufficientish.com/forum/view ... ilit=hydro
Then get or make enough troughs to fill the space and away you go. Take the troughs/containers into account when building the staging, i.e. staging height = waist height minus container depth, so that container surface is at waist height

Things to grow, strawberries (bare rooted available now), dwarf French beans, carrots, spring onions, lettuces, dwarf runner beans (needs bees), dwarf peas (although not very productive), radishes, celery, cucumbers, Sutton broad beans (needs bees), broccoli & cauliflower (during winter/spring) and certain dwarfish varieties of peppers and tomatoes.
All of those I have successfully grown myself over the last few years, in containers at waist height.

Plus you still have the beds underneath to plant other stuff if you can get occasional help.

It's a bugger getting old, isn't it? :lol:
Tony

Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 7782
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290372Post ina
Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:10 am

Odsox wrote:
It's a bugger getting old, isn't it? :lol:
Don't I know it... :(

However - I think there will always be a certain amount of bending etc be involved in establishing whatever crop you grow. even if it is at waist height, like strawberries... I like my raised beds; certainly make life easier.
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

Jansman
margo - newbie
margo - newbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jan 01, 2014 9:43 pm
latitude: 110
longitude: 110

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290379Post Jansman
Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:31 am

Its a good point about using staging.I have made similar to go over my row of compost bins.On this I grow all sorts in containers and therevis no bending and such.In Spring I shall expand on this as it increases my growing area.

User avatar
Weedo
Living the good life
Living the good life
Posts: 354
Joined: Thu Jun 30, 2016 4:47 am
latitude: 35.0886S
longitude: 147.1289E
Location: Collingullie Australia

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290404Post Weedo
Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:05 pm

Have a look at this site for ideas - I did, briefly, look at doing something like this in another time and space (big city flat balcony)
[url][https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/60094976248100251//url]
The winner of the rat race is still a rat!

User avatar
MKG
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5134
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 5:15 pm
Location: North Notts.

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290406Post MKG
Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:42 pm

I should have been more specific. I CAN kneel down - but I can't get back up again, so If I'm by myself it would be a stupid thing to do. I can also bend a bit, but it's pot luck - half of the time my back cramps and locks and, believe me, that makes me say "Golly Gosh, that smarts a little". Something like that, anyway.
Beans are taken care of - they're in very large pots just outside the house. I was worried that they wouldn't crop well, but they happily produce beans to the point of saturation, as all bean crops should.
I have a greenhouse and a half of staging, but I simply cannot help looking at the space beneath them and making impossible plans. I think I need a motorised staging system which brings any one of four growing surfaces to the top at the push of a button. I'm thinking of calling the system the Porcine Aviator.
Thanks for the Real Seeds tip, Flo - but I already use them. Their jalapeno claims are perfectly true - you CAN produce fully reddened jalapenos in the UK, and I have loads in the freezer to prove it. I save the seed - it comes up absolutely true, but then no one else anywhere near me grows chillis.
I hadn't thought of ginger and turmeric - but I am now, thanks to whotsername up in the frozen north.
I think I know what the problem is - it's the thought of expanding lawns rather than using the land a bit more productively. It strikes despair into my heart - not really because of the lost growing opportunities but because it means more bloody mowing.
Still - beggars and choosers, you know.
The secret of life is to aim below the head (With thanks to MMM)

User avatar
Thomzo
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 4291
Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2007 1:42 pm
Location: Swindon, South West England

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290420Post Thomzo
Tue Dec 19, 2017 6:22 pm

MKG don’t lose heart and turn the garden into lawn. There must be another way. Is there any possibility of swapping spare fruit for vegetables? That way you could plant more tall fruits but still get vegetables. Also, what about raised planting outside? Search on Pinterest for pallet planters for salads, potatoes in pots, carrots in plastic boxes etc.

Also, give up gluten now. There’s a proven link between eating gluten and getting arthritis.
Think globally, shop locally
Check out my blog at http://designedbyzoe.blogspot.com/
http://www.thomzo.co.uk

User avatar
MKG
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5134
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 5:15 pm
Location: North Notts.

Re: Vertical gardening

Post: # 290423Post MKG
Wed Dec 20, 2017 10:42 am

Hi Thomzo - nice to talk to you again.
Don't worry - I'm just having a general moan. My knees and back have done pretty well but they're getting on a bit now, so it's more a man-moan than anything else. I did toy with the idea, last night, of getting sunken paths dug and it took a while to realise what idiocy that was. I blame the homebrew which, thankfully, I can still make at waist height and drink at mouth height. When I can't do the last bit, I'll know it's time for the scrapheap.
The secret of life is to aim below the head (With thanks to MMM)

Post Reply