I'm not a plastic bag.

Want to share some knowledge of eco products. Or have you heard about any new eco projects that you want to share with the world?
legendaryone
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 9:01 am

I'm not a plastic bag.

Post: #51075 legendaryone
Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:56 pm

Thought this may be of interest

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6448687.stm
Never say 'OOPS!' Always say 'Ah, Interesting!'

User avatar
OurEcoHouse
margo - newbie
margo - newbie
Posts: 13
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 5:43 pm
Contact:

Re: I'm not a plastic bag.

Post: #57943 OurEcoHouse
Sun May 20, 2007 8:18 am

BBC News wrote:The average Briton uses 167 plastic bags every year - 10 billion in total.


It's unbelievable. They really should charge for every plastic bag like £0.10 and you would see how the usage could drop.

User avatar
ohareward
Living the good life
Living the good life
Posts: 435
Joined: Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:48 am
Location: Ohoka, Nth Canty, New Zealand

Post: #57949 ohareward
Sun May 20, 2007 9:14 am

One of our supermarkets is asking people with three items or less to carry their purchases rather than using a plastic bag. It's a start I suppose. For all people know the supermarkets might have shares in the plastic bag companies.

Robin
'You know you are a hard-core gardener if you deadhead flowers in other people's gardens.

To err is human. To blame someone else, is management potential.

User avatar
Nikki
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 174
Joined: Thu May 17, 2007 12:50 pm
Location: Northamptonshire

Post: #58001 Nikki
Sun May 20, 2007 5:14 pm

I agree with OurEcoHouse.

Look at Aldi stores in UK. They're cheap and sort of cheerful supermarket. They charge for their bags. You hardly ever see people buying them. People either stuff everything into their cars or bring used bags from home.

At least many supermarkets are offering their own branded re-usable bags. But most people are too lazy/complacent to bother. Charge them for the plastics and sudddenly you'll see a change.

:dave:
Interests: land care, organic, permaculture, animal welfare, home education, tea.

User avatar
Silver Ether
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 1284
Joined: Fri May 18, 2007 4:31 pm
Location: in amongs the roots of Mercia
Contact:

Post: #58010 Silver Ether
Sun May 20, 2007 6:46 pm

Why dont you make your own re-useable ones??? I do ... and I try to either use good heavyish canvas or recycle fabric .. eg curtains and line them with
calico type stuff ... depends what I can get my grubby little mitts on :flower:

Image


Image

User avatar
hamster
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 883
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 3:52 pm
Location: Wokingham (Berks.), UK

Post: #58013 hamster
Sun May 20, 2007 8:22 pm

Ooh, those are lovely! V impressed!

I saw someone the other day with an 'I'm not a plastic bag' bag, but she was using it as a handbag and putting her shopping in a carrier bag! Even worse, this was in M&S, where they have signs up all over the place saying 'Do you need a bag?' and a huge display of reusable bags behind the tills...
They're not weeds - that's a habitat for wildlife, don't you know?

http://sproutingbroccoli.wordpress.com

User avatar
Cornelian
Living the good life
Living the good life
Posts: 255
Joined: Thu Apr 26, 2007 3:58 am
Location: Cornelian Bay, Tasmania

Post: #58017 Cornelian
Sun May 20, 2007 8:45 pm

People in Australia seem to be very aware of the plastic bag issue - Tasmania is working towards a complete ban, and certainly in the supermakets in the 2 states I have lived in over the past 15 years, far more people use the canvas tote bag than plastic - supermarkets sell them for under $1. If you buy under 3 items in a supermarket here then odds are you will simply be handed them straight back to you - not even offered a bag.
Image

If you want to be happy for a day, buy a car. If you want to be happy for a weekend, get married. If you want to be happy for a lifetime, be a gardener.

User avatar
colhut
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 136
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:00 pm
Location: Devon

Post: #58029 colhut
Sun May 20, 2007 10:16 pm

it doesn't happen much these days, but when I was a kid it was normal that while all the shopping was being dealt with at the checkout us kids would scurry off to find boxes to pack them in, not a plastic bag in sight. Now I realise that cardboard packaging needs to be reduced too, but you only have to see the rubbish containers in the supermarkets to know that there are enough boxes there to offset a few thousand bags and if the cardboard is then collected and recycled there is no loss there either.
How hard can it be, how long can it take. What could POSSIBLY go wrong

User avatar
possum
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 786
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 4:24 am
Location: NZ-formerly UK

Post: #58035 possum
Mon May 21, 2007 1:34 am

Although generally I agree we should produce less rubbish.
I did go through a stage of always taking an old fashioned shopping basket with me, but then I found that I needed to buy bin bags instead of re-using the carriers, which obviously didn't help the environment one bit.
I think the only solution is biodegradable ones. I had one a few months back which I hadn't realised was biodegradable, I left it outside for a month with soemthing inside it, when I finally remembered to pick it up it looked like a pile of confetti and that was only a month of degrading

ina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 7704
Joined: Sun May 22, 2005 9:16 pm
Location: Kincardineshire, Scotland

Post: #58047 ina
Mon May 21, 2007 6:29 am

possum wrote:but then I found that I needed to buy bin bags instead of re-using the carriers


I don't use bin bags - they are not necessary. If you have really messy stuff to get rid of, use some of the other "rubbish" (bags, wrappers) to wrap it up in. And no, my bin doesn't get overly dirty, and nothing stinks.
Ina
I'm a size 10, really; I wear a 20 for comfort. (Gina Yashere)

User avatar
red
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 6513
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:59 pm
Location: Devon UK
Contact:

Post: #58070 red
Mon May 21, 2007 9:50 am

yeh - I thought I was doing my bit for the environment by using carrier bags in my bin - then one day i realised it was not necessary, AND we were still bringing in more bags than using. so starting to stockpile them. we now have a very small bin (used to be a flour barrel or something) which means it gets emptied often, and so does not get a chance to get stinky. Its small enough to put in the sink - so when necessary, I can wash it. the only problem we have is with something a bit nasty - like fish heads! - Even when I wrapped these in paper - by the time the brown bin was emptied.. we had maggots...eew. and the bin men would not take it away....so with something particularly nasty, i might wrap in a bread bag first - which i realise is far from perfect - but at least we are doing much better than before.

Our council advertise these cornstarch bin liners - but I do have to wonder just now much land is being dedicated to growing corn to be bin bags.. its bothers me...
Red

I like like minded people... a bit like minded anyway.. well people with bits of their minds that are like the bits of my mind that I like...

my website: colour it green

etsy shop

blog

User avatar
possum
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 786
Joined: Tue May 08, 2007 4:24 am
Location: NZ-formerly UK

Post: #58082 possum
Mon May 21, 2007 11:16 am

ina wrote:
possum wrote:but then I found that I needed to buy bin bags instead of re-using the carriers


I don't use bin bags - they are not necessary. If you have really messy stuff to get rid of, use some of the other "rubbish" (bags, wrappers) to wrap it up in. And no, my bin doesn't get overly dirty, and nothing stinks.

The problem is that here our rubbish is not collected and we have no outside bin, so I would have to chuck an assortment of small rubbish packages in the boot of the car to take to the transfer station.

User avatar
Mare Owner
Tom Good
Tom Good
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2007 5:43 am
Location: Minnesota, USA
Contact:

Post: #58146 Mare Owner
Tue May 22, 2007 5:35 am

You all are way ahead of us. Every store here now automatically gives you plastic bags. Grocery stores do still have paper, and you can get those if you ask for them, but the other stores are mostly all plastic. :(

User avatar
flower
Barbara Good
Barbara Good
Posts: 140
Joined: Wed Mar 07, 2007 12:19 pm

Post: #58150 flower
Tue May 22, 2007 8:38 am

Years ago, Safeways used only paper sacks made from recycled stuff.
granted, they didn't have handles so weren't as convenient as carrier bags.

Supermarkets thrive because they kid people into believing they are more convenient. Their marketing strategy depends upon people going in for one thing and coming out with a dozen.
Therefore, thinking they're only getting one item, lot's of shoppers don't have their 'bag fo life' with them and resent the cost of another one.

I think that if they only had the option of a paper sack or of buying a reusable, everyone would be happy.

User avatar
Clara
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
Posts: 1253
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 9:29 pm
Location: Las Alpujarras, Spain

Post: #58163 Clara
Tue May 22, 2007 12:15 pm

possum wrote:
ina wrote:
possum wrote:but then I found that I needed to buy bin bags instead of re-using the carriers


I don't use bin bags - they are not necessary. If you have really messy stuff to get rid of, use some of the other "rubbish" (bags, wrappers) to wrap it up in. And no, my bin doesn't get overly dirty, and nothing stinks.

The problem is that here our rubbish is not collected and we have no outside bin, so I would have to chuck an assortment of small rubbish packages in the boot of the car to take to the transfer station.


We "struggled" with the same problem because we have to carry our rubbish and recycling 1km to the nearest village. But because we have chickens, dogs and a compost heap, there is never anything food like in the bin. This means we don´t need a bin liner and we can take the rubbish out in the bin, strapped to our backs on the metal frame of a old rucksack that we use to bring gas cylinders and the like in.

We only realised this was the solution when we found that we´d been so good about taking out cloth bags that there wasn´t a single plastic bag in the house.

So could your solution be something similar? Perhaps having more than one bin and then taking them in your car to the tip, to make the journey efficient. We used to live where we had car access but couldn´t have a compost heap (rented house), and having a bin liner split in the boot in the heat of a Spanish summer created quite a stink, wish we´d thought about taking the whole bin then.

Clara x.
baby-loving, earth-digging, bread-baking, jam-making, off-grid, off-road 21st century domestic goddess....

...and eco campsite owner


Return to “Eco Products and Innovations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests