almonds

Want to talk about fruit and nuts? Got any problems? Here's your place to post.

almonds

Postby oldjerry » Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:05 am

Anyone got any experience of growing almonds ?
Average garden,English Midlands,south facing wall. I've looked at Robjin,which I can get on Pixie (I like small rootstocks) but some site or other is pushing something French and late flowering called Madaline(anybody come across this?).
Lastly,other than nets,spraying cold water etc,how do you protect yours from late frosts,or aren't they such a big deal?

Thanks.
oldjerry
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
 
Posts: 2101
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:57 am

Re: almonds

Postby Skippy » Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:35 am

I've got an almond tree although I can't really offer much in the way of advice. It's in the front garden of my house which is on the north side and near to the road. No idea of which specfic species.
To be honest I don't really do much with it to look after it and just let it get on with doing what it does. The trunk is about 6 inches across and apart from the occasionaly prune and feed all I do is pick the nuts. I did feed it a bag of bat droppings one year and the crop was good, this year however the crop has been on the small side. It crops before frosts and I don't cover the tree or anything. It's pretty much lost most of the leaves now but they'll be back next year .


Pete
Skippy
Living the good life
Living the good life
 
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 5:13 pm
Location: south staffordshire

Re: almonds

Postby safronsue » Mon Dec 03, 2012 10:35 am

We have productive trees here and we get down to -20 so i guess your winters won't be an issue. good luck.
User avatar
safronsue
Living the good life
Living the good life
 
Posts: 279
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:03 pm
Location: Kozani, Greece

Re: almonds

Postby oldjerry » Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:31 pm

SS,It's not so much the low temps,but the probs of a late frost taking out the blossom,as this flowers early for a Prunus.
Skip,I'm encouraged,as I'm a bit South of you,so hopefully I'll get a bit of a crop. Thanks both..

Mind you here was I imagining RRE would announce that he was surrounded by Madalines(i.e. the almond not some French bird) and give fullsome cultivation details,followed by Contadina with a kickass receipe for Amorretto...................
oldjerry
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
 
Posts: 2101
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:57 am

Re: almonds

Postby safronsue » Mon Dec 03, 2012 7:54 pm

ah, that's why some years fail.
User avatar
safronsue
Living the good life
Living the good life
 
Posts: 279
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:03 pm
Location: Kozani, Greece

Re: almonds

Postby contadina » Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:50 am

Madeleines and amaretto have got to be worth the risk of a late frost OJ :iconbiggrin: although you'll need at least two trees (sweet almonds for the dolci and bitter almonds for the booze).
User avatar
contadina
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
 
Posts: 785
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 12:11 pm
Location: Puglia, Italy

Re: almonds

Postby oldjerry » Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:43 am

That's what I like about this site'I hadn't even realised there were sweet and bitter varieties,(I thought the latter were just unripe!).The only variety I've found available over here is this Robyn thing,plus references to this Madaline thing (french)as opposed to madelienes ,which is what I'm hoping to be over indulging on in a couple of years.Seems like I may have to look in some nurseries outside the UK, people don't seem to grow so many nuts here compared to say top fruit,considering their food value,quite surprising really.
oldjerry
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
 
Posts: 2101
Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:57 am

Re: almonds

Postby trampess » Mon Jan 07, 2013 5:33 pm

I have about 20 almond trees in my "allotment" in Spain. The trees more or less do there own thing, in this climate. The trees do need pruning each but no feeding or watering. My main problem is finding ways to use the almonds. I'm trying almond butter which is very taste but labour intensive.
trampess
margo - newbie
margo - newbie
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2013 8:25 am

Re: almonds

Postby demi » Tue Jan 08, 2013 1:18 pm

We've got almond trees in our orchard and i was really looking forward to harvesting them at the end of the year there, but they didn't produce any almonds, very disappointing. But my husband says that happens sometimes. The previous year the squirrels got them.
We just leave the trees to grow and it gets below -20 here every winter. We prune them and give them some water during droughts in summer and that's it. Maybe we should fertilize them with something this year, but we don't have any bat droppings.
Tim Minchin - The Good Book
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kr1I3mBojc0

'If you just close your eyes and block your ears, to the acumulated knowlage of the last 2000 years,
then morally guess what your off the hook, and thank Christ you only have to read one book'
User avatar
demi
A selfsufficientish Regular
A selfsufficientish Regular
 
Posts: 1124
Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 6:03 pm
Location: Prilep, Macedonia

Re: almonds

Postby Skippy » Sun Jan 13, 2013 8:20 pm

I've only had bat droppings once Demi. They are said to be very rich in nutrients but aren't the easiest thing to come across. Bats are of course a protected species and it's illegal to disturbe them. I got the droppings when I worked on an old coach house near Worcester. The bats migrate and we had a "window" to repair the roof before they came back and to effect the repairs needed to shovel out the muck. We did have to put some of it back into the spaces to ensure the building still smelled of "home" to the bats when they returned.


Pete
Skippy
Living the good life
Living the good life
 
Posts: 277
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2012 5:13 pm
Location: south staffordshire


Return to Fruit and Nuts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


.






Ishers books

Adverts (paying the bills)


Find Selfsufficientish on facebook