Cordon fruit trees

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Pumkinpie
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Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273041 Pumkinpie
Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:16 pm

Ground still seems to cold (and frozen ) to put in my maiden fruit trees. Will they be ok for another week or so. I had some maidens delivered about 2 weeks ago now and earthed them in at home just before the last cold snap. I need some decent weather to get them down the allotment.

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diggernotdreamer
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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273043 diggernotdreamer
Sat Mar 30, 2013 10:55 pm

I don't think any harm will come to them, provided the roots don't get dry, I ordered my fruit trees and they arrived two days before the snow and ice in the winter of 2010 and I had to stick them in a pot of compost for a good two months before I could even get them outside, they seem fine and are thriving.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273049 oldjerry
Sun Mar 31, 2013 10:42 am

As things are,don't whatever you do try to water the trees while they are heeled in.If they have got a bit dried out,so be it,if you water then it freezes again they will suffer(and if it's not freezing get them planted!).
I'm with DnD,they won't come to any harm,if they begin to break bud,fleece them up,save any damage. I've had similar probs this year,but most fruit,soft,or top,is really resilient,they will need PLENTY of water when they eventually are planted,every couple of days if there's no rainfall ,for a couple of weeks. Don't worry!!

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273639 Pumkinpie
Thu May 02, 2013 11:22 am

Got most of the trees in. The ones I've got left over I am going to put in large pots. Prune and start to shape in the tubs, that way they will be already to be planted in the autumn and should establish better. It will also give me a chance to prepare the planting positions and do a bit more planning. The blueberries appear to have survived the winter, some ericacious compost needed to put them in their final planting positions.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273640 oldjerry
Thu May 02, 2013 1:05 pm

If they're maidens,best not'overpot' them,better they establish a decent root system in say a 5 litre pot,that way you'll have a decent rootball that doesn't fall apart on you when you eventually plant them next back end,especially as they'll be at an angle.I'm sure long run they'll benefit from you having more time to prep the ground.
S'funny, I've just bunged in 60 ft of apples cordoned,18, in all (10 varieties,2 of each,waiting for the last 2 as the grower is grafting them on to M9 this year,hard to get variety,so all finished next Nov),thing is,and I've done a lot with top fruit,I never realised how much earlier in to flower some varieties are over others..on the same cordon,some varieties are in full blossom,while a couple have barely broken bud....if you had these PP you could still plant them in the ground!

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273641 Odsox
Thu May 02, 2013 2:41 pm

oldjerry wrote:,thing is,and I've done a lot with top fruit,I never realised how much earlier in to flower some varieties are over others..on the same cordon,some varieties are in full blossom,while a couple have barely broken bud

The have a mind of their own OJ. :roll:
I planted up our orchard several years ago, and planned it highly scientifically so that the early flowering varieties were planted in the most sheltered part of the plot and the much later flowering ones in the most exposed part.
Needless to say they all got together, discussed what a prat I am and proceeded to flower in the opposite order, or even worse in just random order. Thankfully the bees understand my foolishness and pollinate them all even if the do have to fly from one end of the orchard to the other to do it.
Tony

Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273644 Pumkinpie
Fri May 03, 2013 3:11 am

Thanks for advice, I have worked out which pollination groups the apples are in. If I have done my home work right the ones that flower at the same time should be near each other. Oh by the way my
birthday present from work a lovely little apple tree called Charlotte was in bud yesterday. It's going to be bright and sunny at the week end so it should be very pretty down there . Here's to some lovely fruit in the autumn and no good late frosts to catch us out. I might just keep a bit of fleece handy to throw over the blossoms.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273649 oldjerry
Fri May 03, 2013 8:03 am

Another good tip,and the last one(promise), and you may well do it anyhow,keep a watering can/bucket full of water out with ,your trees.If there's a late frost fill sprayer(little indoor job will do) with said water first thing in the morning and spray on frosted blossom/tender buds.For some reason(I'm no scientist but I presume it's to do with slowly defrosting,as opposed to quick, which is what happens on clear late spring days) this will often save the blossom from damage.That's it....I'm off to plan some step over pears for the Autumn,never done them before.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273650 Odsox
Fri May 03, 2013 8:40 am

Good advice OJ, but better still is to spray the buds/blossom when frost first begins, that way ice forms a protective shell around the vulnerable part and keeps the internal (bud) temperature at zero degrees when it could be a killer minus several degrees elsewhere.
Soft fruit farmers use this technique by spraying whole fields with plain water when the temperature dips to 3 degrees from bud burst stage onwards.
Tony

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #273653 oldjerry
Fri May 03, 2013 12:04 pm

Well I didn't realise that,and it makes sense,my little idea was more for when you arent expecting a frost,and wake up in a panic....ok..when you get slaughtered and forget to fleece up the peaches!

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #274705 Pumkinpie
Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:43 am

I am really pleased as most of my cordons seem to have survived the rough treatment they were given in the spring and the delay in planting. I might have lost one but the rest are really nice and healthy. I will get some more from the same grower if I need any more as they are quality.
My birthday tree has a healthy but small crop developing . I can't wait to get my first small apple crop.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #274742 Pumkinpie
Wed Jun 12, 2013 9:51 am

The little grey vermin with long bushy tails have had a field day today digging in the pots with my left over fruit trees in. I hope they have not done too much damage. I wonder what they were looking for.
Any way I better go and water them and check that they are ok

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #274813 Pumkinpie
Mon Jun 17, 2013 11:27 am

I think the one I thought I lost might be showing signs of life. I think there are some buds forming on the stem. Better late than never. Nature is wonderful helped along with a little love , care , compost ,water and sun.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #276697 Pumkinpie
Sun Nov 03, 2013 8:09 am

The sun is shining and after all the rain we have had the ground should be just right for digging a few holes to plant the trees that have been living in pots round the edge of my garden all summer.
Off for a tidy up on the plot and preparing the ground for the trees.
Happy autumn.

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Re: Cordon fruit trees

Post: #276698 Pumkinpie
Sun Nov 03, 2013 2:08 pm

Sun didn't shine for long then stair rods of rain.
Never mind some tidying up and preparing for my new fruit trees.
Also munched on autumn raspberries and blue berries, I can't believe its autumn .


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