Sea fishing?

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green_pea
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Sea fishing?

Post: #240232 green_pea
Thu Aug 04, 2011 6:15 am

I need some advice on gear for sea fishing (as in, the type where you stand on the beach) we've decided to get some rods/a rod and give it a go as we live really close to the sea and g used to love going with his dad as a kid (I would have done too, but I grew up being told ''that isn't for girls''' as with everything I asked to do, pah! :? ).

Anyway, we've bought the river cottage garden sea fishing book as a general guide as it has really good reviews and we found a copy quite cheap (hasn't arrived yet though). I'm aware that we should be going for a 12-13 foot rod, fixed spool, and something about 6-8oz for what we will be catching at the shore, but that is about the point at which I get lost and earn a glazed expression.

So what else do we need? Is it best to buy it as a set, or separate? I just assumed that everything came together, but then apparently not, not sure if rods come with spools, reels, hooks, weight thingy, bobber float? What should we be looking for when buying those bits? If someone could explain what these bits are actually for I'd be grateful.


Should we be looking to buy just one rod and take turns, or one each? We aren't looking to catch loads at once, just what we need really.



Oh also, we are in the process of fixing our vehicle too so we can't really get to a proper angling shop, so will probably buy second hand on ebay (or maybe new, there are a few shops which look fine).

Any help appreciated as usual :salute:

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MKG
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240239 MKG
Thu Aug 04, 2011 8:44 am

Phew ... long answer really required.

First of all, don't buy any tackle until that book has arrived and you've read it thoroughly. So much depends upon what kind of beach you'll be fishing from, so your question is really a "how long is a piece of string?" thing.

Fixed spool reels are the easiest to use but they put kinks in your line. You may want to look at a multiplier reel which, although you need to practice with it, is an "in-line" bit of kit which doesn't twist the line and will hold more line anyway.

You need to find out about shock leaders - a much stronger bit of line about 20 feet in length which takes the strain of chucking a heavy bit of lead out a long way. If you don't have one, you're going to lose an awful lot of tackle. You also need to learn how to tie efficient knots in nylon monofilament line, and about the various arrangements of end-tackle (i.e. exactly where do you put the hook?).

Etc. etc. etc. etc.

Oh - beachcasting is a patient sport. I wouldn't assume that just because you get there and stay for six hours, you're actually going to catch anything to eat :iconbiggrin: :iconbiggrin:

Mike
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240247 Dr.Syn
Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:48 am

After you get your book and decide what you are going to do make friends with a tackle shop. They want you as a customer so they will give you good advice and probly tell you the best areas to go. It maght be an idea to get some casting lessons to give you a little confidence. The last paragraph of MKG is the most important.

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green_pea
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240249 green_pea
Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:52 am

Thanks Mike, I'll wait and see what the book says then ask again if things are still confusing me. I read somewhere that fixed spool is good because of something to do with being able to load 2 different reels on for different types of beaches (e.g . rocky or clean), where as with the multiplier you need loads of fancy stuff. We just want something simple really, to start out with anyway. Wishful thinking had me hoping there would be a general set of tackle. Am I to be sadly disappointed?
Ahh, I can think of worse ways to spend six hours though, can't you? :iconbiggrin: The idea of it came up more as something to do for hobby/getting out of town more often, before the thought of getting food came from it (which is obviously a benefit!). Hopefully this book will turn up before we go away on holiday so we can sort something out!

Dr.Syn: My friend is big on hunting and I THINK if I remember correctly fishing too, so I'll see if he can guide me in the right direction of a decent tackle shop, if I can ever bloody get hold of him this is! Thanks. :iconbiggrin:

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MKG
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240257 MKG
Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:36 pm

Sorry, green_pea - I wasn't trying to sound pessimistic. Yes, you're absolutely right - I cannot imagine a more restful way of spending a day than fishing, even though I haven't done it for some years now. What I was trying to get across was exactly what you put your finger on - there's no "holy grail" of fishing tackle set-ups. It's what a) suits the fish and b) what suits you and c) what suits the ground you're fishing on (not necessarily in that order).

The really BIG thing to do is get to know your venue. If it's a beach, get there and walk it at low tide so that you know the conditions, where the gullies are, where the lugworms are, where the deep pools are etc. Then look at it at high tide, when you'll realise how difficult it is to find all those places you spotted earlier when they're covered in water. Find out what species you might expect to catch there - it's no good fishing for dabs with a hook the size of a thing you'd use to catch sharks. Find out all you can about those expected species - how and when they feed and what they feed on helps a lot.

Above all, don't go overboard. It's very easy to spend an absolute fortune on fishing tackle when it isn't necessarily needed. Buy good basics - the most valuable part of your fishing, you'll find, is your knowledge.

Mike
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240261 zaxdog
Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:22 pm

I am a complete amateur when it comes to fishing but I have had found for myself as a beginner if you have a pier or sea wall near you a boat rod is great. You can buy a basic one really cheaply and with a few packets of mackerel feathers you are good to go at this time of year!

Another thing I would say is not to forget a "priest" or other heavy stick or whatever to dispatch your catch quickly.


I had to be held back by the OH the other day as a fisherman pulled mackerel from the sea near us and just left them flopping about to die :angryfire: That said the OH then went over and calmly had a word with said bloke (I was all for pushing him off the pier :shock: )

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SouthernDave
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240264 SouthernDave
Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:29 pm

Hi! I sea fish having returned to the sport in the last few years and can offer the following advice:

1. If you can, go with someone who already fishes in your area and see if you like it. It can be great fun and exciting, but it can also be cold and miserable.

2. If you don't know anyone, try your local sea angling club who may even offer beginner's advice sessions. Casting is tricky if you have no experience and even one paid for training session will re-pay itself over and over.

3. I have not seen the Rover Cottage book, but as it is a middle-class cooking based franchise, I am not convinced of it's validity as a beginner's sea fishing course/guide - personally I cannot imagine Hugh Fairly-Wittering-on standing on a beach in the North East for hours on end in the rain and wind..... This book on Amazon is cheap, simply written and contains timeless advice on the basics of the sport, the equipment and more importantly the fish. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sea-Fishing-Properly-Explained-Ball/dp/071602201X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312470796&sr=8-1

4. For beachcasting, yes a 12-13 foot beachcasting rod with a fixed spool reel will get you started. You'll need line, a shock leader as mentioned above, some hooks and weights and a few other basics bits of tackle. Visit your local tackle shop and tell them what you want to do, how much your budget it and he will advise accordingly. You can kit yourself out via eBay for sure, BUT you have to know what your looking for and there will be no come back if what you buy is no good or doesn't suit what you want it to do. Less than £100 could set you up fine from you local shop, less if money is really tight - you can always upgrade the gear as you go. The thing you'll get from the local tackle shop which eBay WON'T provide is knowledge, experience and advice pure tailored to YOUR needs and budget. eBay sellers want to shift stock, your tackle shop wants you back again and again and to buy bait every trip - who's going to want to help you more?!

5. Enjoy it! Sea fishing is a great sport, however for me the jey is the word fishing and not catching. The fun part is in the mystery of what, if anything, will fall to your tackle, tactics and bait. If you go with the expectation you'll catch EVERY time or with the thought that you can put a meal on the table EVERY trip, you may be disappointed! For guaranteed catching, you'll need a trawler! :wink:

Let us know how you get on and tight lines! :thumbright:

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StripyPixieSocks
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240267 StripyPixieSocks
Thu Aug 04, 2011 3:46 pm

We made fast friends with our local tackle shop and their advice and guidance about purchases, methods, knots, what's around fish wise etc has proved invaluable so I'd say find a good one and chat to them / ask their advice. Tell them what you want to catch and where and they will guide you to the right rod for you :)

We currently have 3 rods, 1 beachcaster, 1 spinning rod and 1 generic rod. If you are fishing from the beach you need a beachcaster to get the bait out past the surf line (so it won't wash back in too soon). If you're pier / jetty fishing then a generic rod or bassing rod will do the trick, this rod can also be used for rock fishing although you may want to look into a lighter rod for that.

We also have a Priest which is just a heavy stick which despatches them instantly as leaving them flapping around is just cruel AND will make the fish flesh taste nasty too!
Also, keeping fish fresh is importnat, don't just stick them in a black carrier bag in the sun once caught... put them in a cooler if possible because they will spoil quickly inside a warm plastic bag!
Definitely read up on things like rigs, tackle, weights, spinners and the like (the list is practically endless) if you are targetting specific fish, also find out the levels the fish live at as this also helps you catch the fish you want and not just pot luck.

Also don't forget to wrap up warm as it can get very cold, very quickly near the sea, take snacks and a warm drink, chairs, first aid kit, suncream if it's going to be hot, torch if you're night fishing and ALWAYS take a mobile phone just incase! We also have a walkie talkie set so we can talk to each other if out of sight. Just general common sense stuff really but you never know!

Most of all,,, HAVE FUN! You may blank (not catch anything) alot and as such you should look at the hobby as just that... a hobby and time out in the fresh air because if you look at it as a reliable means of budget cutting you might get disheartened and give up (we nearly did). Most times we go fishing we go for the fresh air and scenery, if we catch fish it's a bonus. I know Hugh makes it look like you can catch a million fish in an hour but remember, it may be just that it would be boring filming if he caught nothing all the time ;)

It's a great hobby and fresh fish is magical! You'll be addicted in no time at all :D

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green_pea
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240319 green_pea
Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:14 pm

Ok so good news- my friend does fish, has a relative who is a fisherman, is on friendly terms with a couple of angling shops, and knows someone who is wanting to get rid of some tackle to a new home! More good news is that he offered to come with us the first couple of times to show us the ropes, and suggested for us to come on his family's boat and borrow their open sea stuff to see how we like that side of things, seen as we are interested.

As for the book, I think that HFW is a pompous twit, but the book got good reviews for not assuming prior knowledge and its fish I.D. section. Lucky we have someone to teach us about the actual fishing bit though, as I doubt the info you would get from any book could ever match physical guidance.

Cumbrian
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240321 Cumbrian
Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:48 pm

Best beachcaster is usually 12', 2-piece. Weights I use 4oz. / 5 oz.
Fixed spool reel are easier, multipliers are good but can be difficult to master, especially at dark.
Bottom gear keep it simple, I use 1 hook, 2' line away from weight, a piece of string to loop weight in to line, prevents fraying, no other bits.
Rod rest is 2 x 6' bamboos tied together 6" from the top.
Any bucket I can find for worm/crab bait, a bit of damp seaweed on top, can be frehed up with salt water.
Keep it simple.
Make friends with other anglers, they tend to be friendly and helpful, join a club if there is one.

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SouthernDave
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Re: Sea fishing?

Post: #240326 SouthernDave
Fri Aug 05, 2011 5:28 pm

Cumbrian wrote: piece of string to loop weight in to line, prevents fraying, no other bits.


You MUST use a shockleader for beachcasting. Many folk don't and whenever they have a crack off they are putting others in danger. A 5oz weight belting off the tip of a rod into another person or animal does not bear thinking about. They are not expensive but can prevent nasty accidents and frustrating and unnecessary gear loss.


Cumbrian wrote:
Keep it simple.


Amen to that brother! :thumbright:


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