Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

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Andy Hamilton
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Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234192 Andy Hamilton
Fri Jun 03, 2011 11:30 am

Well finally after many years I have joined the housebuying public. We have ended up with a 1980's build house in Bristol.

It has a chimney, with a gas flue going inside it. This I think is a perpose built flue rather than a proper chimney. There is an 80's fire place sitting in the living that I wish to change to a wood burner. The heating is gas powered combi.

So... I'm weighing up my options, we have at least 8 weeks until we move in so should be plenty of time to work out the best thing to do before we even get there. Unfortunately this means I am not armed with all the facts. Soo.... I wondered if anyone knows any ball park figures about fitting wood burners so they meet building regs, what type of chimney/flue or whatever you need. Basically the overall cost of getting a wood burner into my living room.

I'm not entirely sure if I want to have one with a boiler in it that feeds into the hot water/heating supply or just a simple burn logs/get warm one. What are your experiences?

So questions in a nutshell?

How much does it cost to fit a wood burning stove by a proffessional? (or is it a do-able DIY job)?
Will I need a new chimney/flue attached, someone mentioned an external one? - it is an end terrace so this is feasable.
Are second hand ones up to the job?
Is it worth getting a boiler type wood burner or am I better off getting some solar tubes?

Any help with this would be most welcome.
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234208 fruitcake
Fri Jun 03, 2011 1:55 pm


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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234243 Andy Hamilton
Fri Jun 03, 2011 6:30 pm

Very useful, ta.
First we sow the seeds, nature grows the seeds then we eat the seeds. Neil Pye
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234273 John Headstrong
Fri Jun 03, 2011 9:37 pm

this is what you need for research
http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/make_a_chimney.html

basic sums are the wood burner is 50% and the chimney is 50% (or more) of the cost.

get something that you can get at least one pot on to cook, great for stew.

also, get your first load of wood in ASAP, and keep it well covered and dry for winter

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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234373 baldybloke
Sat Jun 04, 2011 6:30 pm

Pop up the A420 to Marshfield and have a look around at R.W. Knights for woodburners, they are pretty helpful. Had one fitted last year which is a bit posh and had the chimney lined etc and didn't get much change out of £2k.
Has anyone seen the plot, I seem to have lost mine?

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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234398 oldjerry
Sat Jun 04, 2011 10:15 pm

Dunno about all the uptodate regs,etc,but here's what I've done: Lined chimneys with stainless liners,not complex,but arduous,and ludicrously expensive when done by so called proffessionals,I like hats on chimneys(even if they aint re commended),but it depends on the draught,and you can always add one later.Most of all you can get 2nd hand bargains,my morso dove £150(new circa 1200).

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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234419 Andy Hamilton
Sun Jun 05, 2011 8:30 am

Right then, so it seems as with most things if I am prepared to do a bit of the work myself and hunt around for a second hand bargain I will save some cash. Otherwise I'm looking at a ballpark of £2000. Hmm... a bit to digest really. I was hoping to come in at £800! Bit more headscratching I think until I make the descision.
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234422 Thomzo
Sun Jun 05, 2011 9:00 am

Hi
Congratulations on the new house. I hope you enjoy it. Nice that you're staying in Bristol after all.

I presume that you've checked that you aren't in a smokeless zone? Defra's website has a very useful link which shows all the smoke control zones in the UK. http://smokecontrol.defra.gov.uk/

If you have a chimney, then use it. It will be far cheaper than putting in a new flue. Even if you have to line the chimney, the flue pipe is much cheaper than the insulated version you would have to use outside.

I have acquired several second hand stoves over the years and never had any problems with them. There are some super bargains on fleabay. I bought a second hand Rayburn a few years back which provided heating for radiators and hot water. I never had any problems with it, although I did buy it from a professional company who had refurbished it. Basically, there are so few parts, there is very little to go wrong, just make sure the boiler hasn't rusted through.

If you do get a back boiler, just be aware that the water can boil, so the system needs to be able to take the heat and the pressure.

If you have a stove that puts out more than 4kw, you now have to have an air vent in the room. It's best, if you can, to run a pipe directly into the stove to comply - otherwise you will get a draught from the air vent.

Finally, factor in the cost of a hearth, if you don't already have a suitable one. You want a nice, deep, fireproof area in front of the stove. Logs and twigs have a habit of jumping out of the stove when you open the door and you don't want them setting fire to the carpet, floorboards, cat....

Lastly, get a flat top so that you can cook or boil a kettle on it.

Enjoy
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #234439 red
Sun Jun 05, 2011 10:36 am

look at the heat output question - we were going to ut a back boiler on our woodburner, but would need a higher rated stove, and then the regs say you have to put in ventilation for higher rated stoves, so we would have ended up putting in a vent to the outside world.. which would seem to defeat the object of trying to warm the house up. at the end of the day we decided to go with a smaller woodburner, it keeps our living room toasty, and we can handle if the rest of the house is cold. in the future we are getting a wood fired esse for the kitchen.

how much room to you have in the fireplace opening? - you want to try and get as much stove in there as poss - as JH says, as least get a stove that you can stand a pot on, there there is one by clearview that has a little oven space above the fire, esse do a lovely looking woodburner come cooker but its quite wide

of you can look at windy smithy http://www.windysmithy.co.uk/html/woodburners.htm who do fairly cheap but practical stoves - designed for use in caravans and yurts etc

getting it fitted by a professional means you have the certificates etc to wave at people when you come to sell the house,. how important this is to you is up to you
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #244281 richardbyles75
Sat Sep 17, 2011 6:16 pm

Hi Andy,

We did a DIY wood burner installation with flue liner a few weeks ago paid £550 for a Aga Little Wenlock Classic stove and about £270 for a liner kit from a company based in Northampton.

If you don't need a liner it could be done much cheaper , then you just need a stove, flue pipe, and registry plate.

First thing to do would be to buy a smoke pellet from a DIY shop to see if your chimney has a good draw, (be ready to open the windows in case the chimney is blocked) If all OK then book a chimney sweep to take a look at your chimney for you (costs about £30) he'll be straight with you.

If you need a liner then you'll need to go up on the roof to feed down the liner, so lots of ladders, safety ropes, a confident builder / roofer mate required. (If you have a friend with a cherry picker you're made up)

Things to think about are how are you and a flue liner going to get up on the roof? I'd go and have a look at the liner in a wood burner stove shop to get an idea about how big it is as it needs some thought and every house is different.

We're loving ours, it's the best thing I've ever done for the house, and the cats love it!

All the best and congrats for your new house.

Richard B.

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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #244487 Andy Hamilton
Mon Sep 19, 2011 6:33 pm

Is this richard byles from Norhthampon, my old mate and ex house mate of Dave? How's it going fella, really nice to hear from you and thanks for the advice most useful.
First we sow the seeds, nature grows the seeds then we eat the seeds. Neil Pye
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Re: Wood burner - what are the initial costs?

Post: #244489 red
Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:19 pm

I'd say definitely go with the advice of a good sweep.

ours lit a smoke pellet and we all went outside to look. and smoke came out of all 4 pots... which means there is a breach somewhere. so we had a liner.


welcome to ish Richard :icon_smile:
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