Installing Recycled Windows

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Boots
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Installing Recycled Windows

Post: #18568 Boots
Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:23 pm

Ok. It is now time for me to look at installing the first window, and I have spent quite some time looking at options on the net. Most refer to wooden frames though, and mine are vinyl. Have never installed a window in my life, but don't think that will stop me.

Have blown up Bats pics to consider the interior setting and his tiled sills. I had planned on setting mine on the outside of the frame to avoid any water hanging in the sills, but do like the look of the sunken frames. The vinyl frames come with a rubber flap that hangs over the sill, so I think it would be best to put them on the outer edge.

At this point of I am thinking of just boxing the vinyl frames and bricking straight in. Not sure if I should box, install and brick - or box, brick and install. Anyone know the best way to way to go with this? I think I am inclined to go with the first, as bricking would mean the wooden frames would get wet/moist, which might make installing later trickier???

There is bound to be something I should be considering, or am likely to have overlooked here, so would really love it if folks could throw in any tips or warnings that may come to mind, or they have experienced.

Ta in advance,

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Muddypause
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Post: #18602 Muddypause
Sat Apr 29, 2006 1:36 am

What makes it difficult to make meaningful comments is that I don't know anything about building with mud bricks, or the type of walls you are building. Are they mortared together somehow (with more mud, maybe?) or perhaps laid dry? And is it a cavity wall or a solid wall? How thick? (you don't have to answer these questions; I'm just pondering).

Anyway, here are some things that occur to me.

Setting the window frame towards the inside of the wall opening is more usual with a solid wall, and generally you need something more than the sill that comes as part of the frame - typically a big thick stone or concrete or maybe slate sill that the frame sits on. But however you do it, try to make it so that any water will be shed away from the wall so that it doesn't have a chance to penetrate vertically.

On a cavity wall. you would also try to have some sort of vertical damp proof membrane (thick polythene would prolly do it, or a bit of roofing felt) that extends from the cavity to the side of the frame, and something similar underneath the frame. But in your dry part of the world, this may not be a real issue. In any case seal around the frame well with something - mastic preferably.

When you talk about boxing the frames, do you mean add an extra wooden frame around the existing frame. Unless the window frame on its own is particularly flimsy, why do this? You should install some sort of lintel or beam over the window to take the load of the wall above it, but the window frame itself shouldn't be under any structural load. Boxing in a plastic window frame may be unnecessary - or is this an issue with mud building (you would, in fact do this on a strawbale build).

Conventionally (bricks and mortar building), you would install the window frame by sitting it on the bricks you have already laid, (bed it down onto mortar) and then bricking up and around it, fixing frame ties to the frame that get embedded into the brickwork as you go, and also working mortar between the frame and the bricks. The frame gives you an absolute edge to work from, and governs the pattern of laying the bricks.

Dunno if that all means anything to you in your situation, but we want pictures anyway, so we can see how it all goes.
Stew

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Boots
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Post: #18604 Boots
Sat Apr 29, 2006 2:11 am

Yes - that is exactly what I was after Muddy, thanks! (Was discussing this with a mate yesterday, and told him I had to check in with Muddy before making a decision :mrgreen: Needless to say, he said "Who?" )

The solid bricks measure about 30 x 20cm and are about 10cm thick. The window frame is 4cm. I was going to box the windows (yes, frame with wood) out to 10cm - mainly just to provide tidy edges that can also take the wear and tear later - but also to make installation easier, as I think bricking in will be easier with wide edges on the sides to come up against.

Am now wondering if I might just include a support beam across the top and build in a wide sill at the bottom, kinda like a shelf, which would still protect it. Maybe not necessary?

Am using a mud mortar, and will definately post pics. Have taken some with you all in mind actually. Just not sure how to reduce them... Could you post a link to a host site that does that? Mine says it does, but then when I post them, they are whoppers! :shock:

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Muddypause
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Post: #18619 Muddypause
Sat Apr 29, 2006 10:07 am

Boots wrote:Needless to say, he said "Who?"


I'm quite happy to accept that my place in the universe is insignificant.

...and then wrote:The window frame is 4cm. I was going to box the windows (yes, frame with wood) out to 10cm - mainly just to provide tidy edges that can also take the wear and tear later - but also to make installation easier, as I think bricking in will be easier with wide edges on the sides to come up against.


That is a pretty narrow frame - I guess I'm thinking more of double glazed stuff, which is typically 2 - 3 times that. But I take your point about the boxing - it's more to protect the edges of the bricks than the frame, right? It probably will make installation easier, too.

...and then wrote:Am now wondering if I might just include a support beam across the top and build in a wide sill at the bottom, kinda like a shelf, which would still protect it. Maybe not necessary?


Are you talking about the inside or the outside - technically, the inside sill is a 'window board'; it is the outside one that is the 'sill'. The job of the outside one is solely to shed water away from the wall (and I guess provide a bit of protection against knocks). In a climate like the UK, the shedding water bit is very important. Inside, it's more to do with convenience - a way of finishing off the top edge of exposed bricks with a useful shelf.

I'd include a support beam across the top, whatever you do. Even if the wall doesn't go much higher, remember that there are roof loads to go on to it yet.

...and then wrote:Am using a mud mortar, and will definately post pics. Have taken some with you all in mind actually. Just not sure how to reduce them... Could you post a link to a host site that does that? Mine says it does, but then when I post them, they are whoppers! :shock:


The only one I know about is www.photobucket.com which can produce a clickable thumbnail image, which will link to the main image. However, last time I used it, it said "Images over x size will be automaticaly reduced" and it was making them pretty small. You could always resize your pics in an image editor. I find Irfanview pretty good, and free (it's a viewer rather than an editor, but can still do things like resizing and cropping).
Stew



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