Calves in the classroom

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ina
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Calves in the classroom

Post: #9733 ina
Sun Jan 29, 2006 8:02 pm

I picked up this book for the horrendous price of 20p at the local charity shop - the title, I thought, promised a bit of rural fun, but I actually got a lot more out of it!

The author is John Terry, and he has written a number of books about "the true story of a school farm in Warwickshire". It is not a potential Booker Price winner, but well written (and has funny drawings, too). However, it's the school farm it describes that I am so excited about: Just what I always thought each and every school should have!

The name of the town is never mentioned - only that it is an industrial town in Warwickshire, with a smallholding attached. Note: His books were published in the 80s - I have no idea whether this school still exists; I fear not, as Google hasn't brought up any information. Back then, all children would spend at least one hour per week over at least two years on the smallholding or in the attached classroom, getting involved in all aspects of it, from growing veg to lambing ewes, from calculating the material needed for a new fence to painting the walls of the calf shed.

I've long believed that if everybody learnt more about how food is produced (and not just the theory of it), there'd be more respect for it; less waste, less pollution, maybe even less vandalism. Kids also learn more about taking responsibility when dealing with livestock - and all the other positive effects of getting in contact with nature. Nowadays, of course, it would only need one little bruise on a child's leg, caused by an animal, to get (some) parents up in arms and sueing the authorities... Oh, and the dangers of e-coli and all those other nasty bugs (which I, who wallows in muck every day :mrgreen: have never had any negative effects from! And you don't want to see the bruises on my legs...).

If anybody happens to know anything about the fate of this school farm, I'd love to hear it!

Ina
Last edited by ina on Mon Jan 30, 2006 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post: #9766 Wombat
Mon Jan 30, 2006 1:40 am

Dead right Ina!

The lcoal high school has a sort of minifarm, but the number of times unpleasant things have happened to the goats or chooks - I have lost count! :cry:

Even the only building (brick at that) was burned down years ago and only the shell remains.

Nev
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Our website on living more sustainably in the suburbs! - http://www.underthechokotree.com/

ina
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Post: #9782 ina
Mon Jan 30, 2006 1:14 pm

Sad, isn't it... Funny enough, there was something on the radio this morning about school farms - but what they call that now is more like a "farm park", where kids go for a day out and have a look round, and touch as little as possible. I heard some weeks ago that they weren't even allowed to collect eggs any more, for fear of dropping dead... (That was before the bird flue scare!)

Ina

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Post: #9795 Wombat
Mon Jan 30, 2006 8:29 pm

I think we have gone too far! the pendulum needs to swing back the other way a bit!

Nev
Garden shed technology rules! - Muddypause


Our website on living more sustainably in the suburbs! - http://www.underthechokotree.com/


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