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Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 2:14 am
by zaffre
Millymollymandy wrote:That giving up smoking book, can't remember what it is called, but the bloke who wrote it died recently from lung cancer. Anyway it didn't bloody work!


I know exactly what you are talking about and I know someone that, after reading it five times, ripped out the last page and used it to make a cigarette...

Ah! Sweet willpower, how you mock me.....

Sigh!

Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 1:02 pm
by QuakerBear
Dear Karen D,

Slight side step, but why would one put cornflour on babies? I'm confused.

Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:27 pm
by mrsflibble
eh?!

Posted: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:30 pm
by mrsflibble
oh. got ya. understand now.

Posted: Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:20 pm
by Karen_D
QuakerBear wrote:Dear Karen D,

Slight side step, but why would one put cornflour on babies? I'm confused.


Cornflour (cornstarch) can be used as an alternative to talcum powder and is absorbant in the same way.

If you have light coloured hair it can be used as a dry shampoo (use a roughly a level teaspoon and comb it through the hair it absorbs greasey stuff around the crown and the hair looks clean).

I can't recall exactly what the book said but it was about using "baby powder" as if it was cornstarch talc rather than talcum powder (which is not edible).

Wassail

Karen

Posted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:32 pm
by quercusrobur
Living Lightly: Travels in Post-Comsumer Society by Dorothy and Walter Shwartz. I bought a copy about ten years ago after being sent a flyer claiming that the book included 'an exclusive interview with Peramculture co-founder david Holmgren', which consisted of about 2 paragraphs... Basically it's their journey around various 'alternative' and 'radical' set-ups around the UK, but their middle class and judgemental perspectives often made me rage and shout at the book, such as when they go to stay with the bloke who single handedly runs an organic box scheme in the Midlands somewhere, and all they do is make comments about his 'threadbare carpet', or remarks about the bloke living at the Pure Genius land squat in Wandsworth who 'still signs on', or their 'guilt' about eating meat. I mean eat meat or don't eat meat, but don't feel 'guitly' about it. And if you DO feel guitly about it don't put it in yer book for flipsake!!!

I read this book back to back with CJ Stone's 'Fierce Dancing', which tells a similar story, ie, his travels around various peaces camps, radical communitys and so forth and could relate to it much better, like the bit where he was meant to travel up to Pollock Road Protest Camp, but ended up getting totally pissed on free lager at the 'Sunday Sport Roadshow' in Glasgow the night before so never made it...

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 9:41 am
by sleepyowl
Generally any books published by Llewelyn as it is a bunch of fluffy headed I talk to dragons nonesense that gives Pagans a rediculous reputation

Re:

Posted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 2:33 am
by Wombat
Karen_D wrote:
QuakerBear wrote:Dear Karen D,

Slight side step, but why would one put cornflour on babies? I'm confused.


Cornflour (cornstarch) can be used as an alternative to talcum powder and is absorbant in the same way.

If you have light coloured hair it can be used as a dry shampoo (use a roughly a level teaspoon and comb it through the hair it absorbs greasey stuff around the crown and the hair looks clean).

I can't recall exactly what the book said but it was about using "baby powder" as if it was cornstarch talc rather than talcum powder (which is not edible).

Wassail

Karen


Thats a good idea! Talcum powder is not good for you (or baby) if inhaled - cornflour is a much better idea! :thumbright:

Nev

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Tue Aug 26, 2008 5:27 am
by Rod in Japan
How to Store Your Garden Produce by Piers Warren

It seems freezing is your best option in nearly every instance. This kind of reference book is really rendered obsolete by the Internet tubes and the Google gnomes.

(The Internet tubes can't be used as mulch however.)

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 4:59 am
by janemiss
Delias, "how to cheat at cooking" - enough said....... - last year dad thought he was doing me a favour. Thats why this year i got money ! bless him

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 7:39 am
by deborah
sleepyowl wrote:Generally any books published by Llewelyn as it is a bunch of fluffy headed I talk to dragons nonesense that gives Pagans a rediculous reputation


True, true ! lmao !!!

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 1:58 pm
by Green Aura
I've had a few busts on the book front
1) The polytunnel companion. It doesn't tell you anything that you can't find for free on any reputable polytunnel website.
2) Permaculture: a designer's manual by Bill mollison. I should point out that this book is not crap - just not much use in temperate climates and cost me a fortune.

I asked OH which gardening books he'd put on this list (he doesn't read most of my other ish stuff) and he said "most of them". While I don't necessarily agree, I know what he means - most British gardening books are talking about the south of England and mention leaving things a couple of weeks later further north.

None even touch on our specific situation up here - maybe I'll have to write one. Although it wouldn't sell many - not enough people :lol:
Can't think of any other's at the mo but they'll come to me.

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 6:47 pm
by Sally Jane
Green Aura wrote:
I asked OH which gardening books he'd put on this list (he doesn't read most of my other ish stuff) and he said "most of them". While I don't necessarily agree, I know what he means - most British gardening books are talking about the south of England and mention leaving things a couple of weeks later further north.

None even touch on our specific situation up here - maybe I'll have to write one. Although it wouldn't sell many - not enough people :lol:
Can't think of any other's at the mo but they'll come to me.


I would buy it!
I'm not as far North as you, Green Aura, but my last garden was in Bedfordshire, and I'm about to start gardening in Cumbria and I expect it to be quite different.
A fruit and veg growing guide that doesn't assume that the only thing that Northerners grow are whippets and black puddings would be very welcome!

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 7:23 pm
by Green Aura
I think we've got plenty of folks from your neck of the woods, but if you need any advice put it in a post. There'll be no shortage of supplies.

Re: Books to avoid

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 7:36 pm
by shae
How to Store Your Garden Produce by Piers Warren
I second this - was very disappointing!