Gravy

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JuzaMum
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Gravy

Post: #277287 JuzaMum
Sun Jan 05, 2014 8:51 pm

I have recently given up half a lifetime of vegetarianism and also decided to no longer use gravy granules (avoiding processed foods). So the question is how do you make decent gravy. Sometimes with a roast and sometimes without a joint.
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Zech
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Re: Gravy

Post: #277298 Zech
Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:03 pm

If you have a roast that's produced some juice, that's the best starting point. After taking the meat out of the oven, I pour off most of the fat (requires a steady hand) and keep the juice in the roasting pan, which I then put on the biggest ring of the hob, on a low heat. If there's a lot of juice, you might not need much else, but I usually add a bit of water from boiled veg (unless it's cabbage). I thicken by mixing plain flour with a little of the meat fat, then stirring in, but you can just as well use cornflour or whatever else you like. Apart from that, it's a matter of adding flavours that you like. For chicken, I always use tarragon and often lemon juice or sorrel. For lamb, I'd add rosemary. You'll probably want salt and pepper, too - a fair bit of salt if you're used to granules. Worcester sauce is good, too, but is also salty so add this before the salt and taste it (I'm sure you know this, but maybe someone reading this doesn't. I'd hate anyone to end up with over-salted gravy! :lol: )

Generally, add everything to the roasting pan, taste often, and stir all the time. It takes me about 5-10 min, I think.

As for making gravy without meat juice, I'm not sure, but I think you'd want to start with a meat stock. This could be made from boiling bones left over from a roast or chops, or from boiling giblets if you have them. We have a griddle pan that we use for steak or chops and I sometimes drain veg water straight into that after cooking (having removed the meat first). This makes a small quantity of stock very easily, and also pre-cleans the pan so it's easier to wash. I'm not sure it does the non-stick surface much good, though. :?
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doofaloofa
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Re: Gravy

Post: #277305 doofaloofa
Mon Jan 06, 2014 6:53 pm

Don't make gravey while smoking a joint

Definately
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diggernotdreamer
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Re: Gravy

Post: #277306 diggernotdreamer
Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:08 pm

It is a real fag making gravy from scratch when you don't have a roast. I have found a very good gravy powder, which I think would cause a parting of the ways for me and the wizard if we ever ran out, and that is Marigold vegetarian gravy powder, it really is the best gravy ever and made from more natural ingredients and is a great store cupboard standby if you are in a hurry. I often make extra gravy when doing roasts so as I can freeze some for using on other meals. If you put some onion, carrot, and any other bits and pieces into a tray with a little oil and cook until caramelised, this forms the basis of quite a nice gravy, the caramelised onion gives a nice dark colour, put your tray onto the stove top and add water, whisking so all the bits get mixed in, if you have stock you could add that, maybe a dash of tomato puree or ketchup, drop of wine, cider, mushroom ketchup is an old fashioned but nice flavouring, thicken with corn flour and strain or pick out the veg bits. Onions and mushrooms put into water on the stove top and cooked down make a good base to which you can add worcs sauce, balsamic vinegar, wine, mushroom ketchup.


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