101 different ways to say the same thing.

101 Uses For is popular and let's hope it stays that way. Our second book is presently called 101 tips for self sufficiency; we will certainly dip into this section for ideas. So post away and let's try and get at least one thread up to 101.
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chadspad
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Post: # 69811Post chadspad »

Courage = spunk :shock:

Doesnt it also mean good-looking 'he's a spunk'
My parents B&B in the beautiful French Vendee http://bed-breakfast-vendee.mysite.orange.co.uk/

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Millymollymandy
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Post: # 69814Post Millymollymandy »

Go and wash your mouth out with soap and water, young lady! :lol:

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chadspad
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Post: # 69815Post chadspad »

:oops: :lol:
My parents B&B in the beautiful French Vendee http://bed-breakfast-vendee.mysite.orange.co.uk/

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Stonehead
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Post: # 69818Post Stonehead »

chadspad wrote:Doesnt it also mean good-looking 'he's a spunk'
That's an old Aussie one. When in my late teens I once had someone call out "Onya, spunky, nice bum". Very good for the ego until I turned around and saw it was a drunken bag lady - without her glasses...
Image

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eva
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Post: # 69834Post eva »

eva wrote: Hazelnuts (US) - Filberts (UK)
My understanding . . . we call them hazelnuts
UK call them hazelnuts too.
Who call 'em filberts anymore? I remember a children's story about a boy and a jar of filberts, and it was in an older UK-edition book, so maybe that's just an anachronistic name for us all?

Glad for the discussion :thumbright:

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red
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Post: # 69862Post red »

when I read 'a Christmas Carol' to my son last thingymas, filberts were mentioned.. I had to look it up.
so I guess they were called filberts at some time here.
Red

I like like minded people... a bit like minded anyway.. well people with bits of their minds that are like the bits of my mind that I like...

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red
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Post: # 69865Post red »

subway (US) sort of sandwich
subway (UK) tunnel under a road for people to walk


Bum (uk) = bottom
Bum (US) = tramp, homeless (UK)
Red

I like like minded people... a bit like minded anyway.. well people with bits of their minds that are like the bits of my mind that I like...

my website: colour it green

etsy shop

blog

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Millymollymandy
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Post: # 69887Post Millymollymandy »

eva wrote:
eva wrote: Hazelnuts (US) - Filberts (UK)
My understanding . . . we call them hazelnuts
UK call them hazelnuts too.
Who call 'em filberts anymore? I remember a children's story about a boy and a jar of filberts, and it was in an older UK-edition book, so maybe that's just an anachronistic name for us all?

Glad for the discussion :thumbright:
I think we had a discussion about hazelnuts somewhere on the forum and no-one quite knew why sometimes they were called "Filberts" and sometimes also "Cobnuts"! I think nowadays they are just generally known as Hazelnuts.

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Thomzo
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Post: # 69895Post Thomzo »

Years ago I worked on the tills at Safeway. One week they would be labelled Hazlenuts and one price charged, the next week they were cobnuts and a different price. I still couldn't tell the difference.

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mrsflibble
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Post: # 70566Post mrsflibble »

polliwog (us) = tadpole (uk)
oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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johnM
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Post: # 72826Post johnM »

bairn (scots) = baby
John

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mrsflibble
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Post: # 72946Post mrsflibble »

barm (yorkshire ish)= yeast
barmy = crazy..... but if in yorkshire it must therefore mean you have a nasty case of thrush or athelete's foot :lol:

one thing which often gets me is "gormless". normal english rules denote that if something is *.*less then it is without *.* ..... so to be gormless is to be without gorm. so WTF is a gorm?!
oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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Millymollymandy
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Post: # 73126Post Millymollymandy »

A brain I think! :mrgreen:

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Millymollymandy
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Post: # 73127Post Millymollymandy »

mrsflibble wrote:barmy = crazy..... but if in yorkshire it must therefore mean you have a nasty case of thrush or athelete's foot :lol:
On this subject, fungi of all kind in French are called "champignons", not just mushrooms, and on the pot of athlete's foot powder I once had the instructions talked about having "champignons" growing between your toes! It turned my stomach having visions of mushrooms or toadstools growing out my feet - as for thrush and imaginging champignons in my nether regions..........urk! :pale: :pale: :pale: :lol: :mrgreen: :lol:

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mrsflibble
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Post: # 73171Post mrsflibble »

I always found it wierd that mushroom is the same in french as it is german.
oh how I love my tea, tea in the afternoon. I can't do without it, and I think I'll have another cup very
ve-he-he-he-heryyyyyyy soooooooooooon!!!!

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