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Allotments under threat

Posted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:34 pm
by Green Aura
I've just seen this and thought I must share it with you all.

http://www.independent.co.uk/property/gardening/exclusive-the-end-of-the-good-life-2277463.html

This is seriously bad news. There is a link, in the article, to write to Eric Pickles in protest, should you wish to.

Re: Allotments under threat

Posted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:59 pm
by old tree man
Wow :shock: that is absolutely criminal, if they can renounce old common laws like that where would it end, with so many people surviving with the use of their allotments and not forgetting in some areas there is the right for common grazing and the right to collect wild bedding for animals, the government can seemingly do what they want when they feel the need to make a profit, the common laws may no longer exist in the near future :( :flower:

Re: Allotments under threat

Posted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 5:42 pm
by Flo
The British Isles needs every inch of growing space for food that can be used. We don't produce enough of our own food without losing allotments.

Re: Allotments under threat

Posted: Thu Feb 20, 2014 10:45 pm
by Zech
Luckily, it didn't actually happen. Look at the date - that's an old article. The current guidance, published just last month, reiterates the 1925 Allotments Act. Information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/allotment-disposal-guidance-safeguards-and-alternatives

Re: Allotments under threat

Posted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 3:30 pm
by Green Aura
I read the report, Rachel, which, it seems to me, gives Councils a perfect way of shifting land.

The get out clause is the bit where no permission from the Secretary of State is required. If the land is not being used currently, or has anyone waiting to use it they can just flog it.

This has only just been published, hence, I presume, the revival of the original article.

Re: Allotments under threat

Posted: Fri Feb 21, 2014 11:39 pm
by Zech
The question we can't answer is whether anything has changed or not. The government often announces "new" initiatives/regulations/guidelines that are exactly the same as the old ones. In this case, the frequent references to the 1925 act suggest no change, but I can't be bothered to look up the old acts for comparison (OK - we probably could find the answer, if we spent long enough trawling through acts of parliament).

The Independent, at least, believed that the threat had gone away: http://www.independent.co.uk/property/gardening/iiosi-campaign-buries-plan-to-close-allotments-2280970.html (published one week after the article telling us the end of the good life is nigh).