soya

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greenorelse
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soya

Post: #219732 greenorelse
Sat Jan 08, 2011 6:13 pm

I thought I'd pass on this information to y'all as 'food for thought'. Apologies if it's old news to any of you.

My daughter's partner had terrible skin problems - acne, redness and itchiness - for years. They've finally hit on the cause, soya. By rigorously eliminating it, her problems have melted away. It's an empowering experience to deal with a medical issue on your own.

Soya is not an easy ingredient to avoid these days, it'll be in frozen peas next if we don't watch out!

So any of you who has, or knows someone with, eczema-like problems, give the soya a miss for a few months. One thing's certain - it won't do you any harm.
There is no question. Cap and Share or TEQs is the answer. Even Cap and Dividend!

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Kezz
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Re: soya

Post: #219765 Kezz
Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:03 am

I've used soya milk instead of cow milk for about 8 years now and for the last 3 (ish) have had severe eczema working it's way all over both hands. I'd not heard of this before. I've had the full set of allergies, asthma and eczema since I was 4, we quit cow milk mainly because we were avoiding growth hormones. But it's also supposed to be one of the causes of those 3 aliments.

I thought soya was safe :( I hate black tea :/

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Re: soya

Post: #219768 Marmalady
Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:27 am

While dairy products are well-known for being a cause of eczema & asthma, soya is also one of the common allergens that has to be specified on ingredient labels.

You might just be unlucky, kezz, and be allergic to both dairy & soya. Have you tried rice milk?

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Re: soya

Post: #219771 Kezz
Sun Jan 09, 2011 1:09 am

I've googled all the alternatives I could think of, (oat, rice, hemp, and almond). Hemp seems the most beneficial nutritionally (and the most expensive!). I couldn't see anything about rice milk being evil, it just said it had little protein compared to soya and cow... I just want milk for tea and cereal that won't make me ill....

ETA: oh hang on, just found some places that say rice milk contains low levels of arsenic.... oat, hemp, or almond it is then!

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Re: soya

Post: #219777 oldjerry
Sun Jan 09, 2011 5:24 am

Kezz wrote:I've used soya milk instead of cow milk for about 8 years now and for the last 3 (ish) have had severe eczema working it's way all over both hands. I'd not heard of this before. I've had the full set of allergies, asthma and eczema since I was 4, we quit cow milk mainly because we were avoiding growth hormones. But it's also supposed to be one of the causes of those 3 aliments.

I thought soya was safe :( I hate black tea :/

A couple of years back,when we had several milking goats a lot of people bought the milk as they believed it helped their kids with asthma and excema.As we sold it green,it was on the understanding that it was for their dogs!!!!!(however it is poss to marker unpastuerised goat milk for humans,so you might be able to find some)
I've no proof if it works,but I hope you can find something that does. Best Wishes.

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Re: soya

Post: #219789 The Riff-Raff Element
Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:21 am

Kezz wrote:ETA: oh hang on, just found some places that say rice milk contains low levels of arsenic.... oat, hemp, or almond it is then!


Better than containing high levels of arsenic! Most foodstuffs - however natural and wholesome - will contain a little because it is in all soils at some level or another.

I thought the use of growth hormones was forbidden in dairy production :scratch:

Anyway, have you a source of unpasturised milk? Some people find the less processed format very helpful with conditions like asthma.

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Re: soya

Post: #219791 oldjerry
Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:30 am

I think that maybe the element of our goat milk that people were interested in.But, RRE, it's damn hard to buy these days in the UK,so called green milk,almost completely dissappeared under a welter of EEC law yonks ago(but the sort of law that only gets enforced in the UK,so in France ,Italy etc. I'm not sure).Come to think about it the same sort of crap stops people keeping a couple of goats in a large back garden,not that much different to having a couple of big(useful) dogs.

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Re: soya

Post: #219800 The Riff-Raff Element
Sun Jan 09, 2011 9:32 am

It's widely available here and, if anything, is growing in popularity. The rules are the same but the spirit in which they are applied is different. It's been a while since I lived in the UK but I recall that anything unpasturised was regarded as downright dangerous and possibly subversive. In France it's still regarded as wholesome.

Here the buying policies of some of the supermarkets actually help this kind of product. Because there is a marked policy of stocking at least some locally produced stuff a farmer with 50 head can make an agreement with two or three local supermarkets, a few local shops, sell a bit direct and have a business. He's not having to supply nationally, which would be practically impossible for a product like raw milk anyway.

Some farmers have even invested in raw-milk dispensing machines: you take your own jug along, pop in 50 cents and it pumps out nicely chilled milk, 24/7. They're appearing on service station forecourts next to the Coke machines. I kid you not.

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Re: soya

Post: #219801 MandyWB
Sun Jan 09, 2011 9:33 am

oldjerry wrote:Come to think about it the same sort of crap stops people keeping a couple of goats in a large back garden,not that much different to having a couple of big(useful) dogs.


Possibly another good reason to get together with some like-minded people and rent a bit of land to keep your goats etc on. Share out the chores as well as the fabulous unpasturised extremely fresh goats milk :cheers: We took the plunge and bought two goats last year and wouldn't be without them now. They are lovely creatures, the fresh unpasturised milk isn't in the least bit "goaty" and both me and my youngest can drink it without allergy problems.

What the world needs is more goats :flower:

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Re: soya

Post: #219814 Kezz
Sun Jan 09, 2011 11:31 am

The Riff-Raff Element wrote:
I thought the use of growth hormones was forbidden in dairy production :scratch:


I wasn't trying to avoid added extras, the milk naturally has some hormones in as it is designed for baby cows to grow. Adults don't need milk, it's for infants, and cross species consumption is a little weird if you think about it.... If you wouldn't drink human breastmilk now it's twice as strange to drink cow milk surely?

ETA: I've tried pasteurised (<- hard to spell!) goats milk, and both hard and soft goats cheese, and it's very chalky tasting. I find the thought of animal milk pretty off putting now since I've been off it so long, I find the smell of cow milk disgusting and can tell instantly if some do gooder has spiked my tea with it. Once you stop drinking it you can understand why other some other cultures think we smell bad, if they consume little to no dairy we must all stink to them lol.

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Re: soya

Post: #219820 The Riff-Raff Element
Sun Jan 09, 2011 12:01 pm

Kezz wrote:
The Riff-Raff Element wrote:
I thought the use of growth hormones was forbidden in dairy production :scratch:


I wasn't trying to avoid added extras, the milk naturally has some hormones in as it is designed for baby cows to grow. Adults don't need milk, it's for infants, and cross species consumption is a little weird if you think about it.... If you wouldn't drink human breastmilk now it's twice as strange to drink cow milk surely?


I confess that I rather thought the point was that adult cows didn't produce growth hormones so it was the injection of these into adults to boost production that was the root of the concerns about transfer in milk.

I am prepared to be corrected :mrgreen:

It is a bit weird drinking the lactations of other species I suppose. That said, I must own to having drunk expressed breast milk on the basis of "waste not, want not" and naked curiousity :oops: and it's not bad. Surprisingly sweet.

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Re: soya

Post: #219838 oldjerry
Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:40 pm

Hmm..is it any different to killing said species and eating them..dunno..
Goat milk only tastes 'goaty' if you: 1. Keep a billy, or at least keep it close to the nannies.
2.Boil the milk.
3.Don't keep muslins,equipment etc. scrupulously clean.

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Re: soya

Post: #219841 skiesabove
Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:18 pm

I like oatmilk the best, since it can be produced locally (soy and rice and almonds have to be imported, they don't grow in Sweden), and it is also easy to make yourself!

1:1 or 1:2 of oats:water, mix, let sit overnight, stir, sieve =). You can add a little oil for a richer flavour.

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Re: soya

Post: #219845 Kezz
Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:32 pm

oldjerry wrote:Hmm..is it any different to killing said species and eating them..dunno..
Goat milk only tastes 'goaty' if you: 1. Keep a billy, or at least keep it close to the nannies.
2.Boil the milk.
3.Don't keep muslins,equipment etc. scrupulously clean.



Well that's another argument entirely as some animals do kill and eat others, no animal milks another except us lol.

Is the chalky taste the goaty taste?

skiesabove wrote:1:1 or 1:2 of oats:water, mix, let sit overnight, stir, sieve =). You can add a little oil for a richer flavour.


Can you just use porridge oats?

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Re: soya

Post: #219858 skiesabove
Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:55 pm

Yup, oats as oats :P.

So much cheaper to buy organic oatflakes than buying organic oat milk :D.


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