Buying some land and living on it.

Anything to do with environmental building projects.
Magpie
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Post: #60477 Magpie
Tue Jun 05, 2007 8:22 pm

I have heard of people here in NZ getting around the permanent thing by putting skids or wheels on structures - maybe you could do that with the platform?

Archie
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Post: #60508 Archie
Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:57 am

With recess-able wheels, which comes down onto slab insulation.
Worth a test case, Yurty. say in St James Park.

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Post: #60510 Yurty
Wed Jun 06, 2007 8:35 am

Oh yeah, I like the sound of that :mrgreen:

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catalyst
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Post: #60565 catalyst
Wed Jun 06, 2007 2:16 pm

sorry paddy, i have to admit that i reacted poorly as i have had a few posts on other forums rubbished by people taking what i said to illogical extremes.
but, personally i dont belive some laws are for the common good (many actually), but to protect privilege and wealth from the masses.

the 2% figure is probably out of date, but my point was the inequality of it all. britain as a whole has the second worst land distribution figures of europe. (behind spain).

Who owns Britain? Most of us would instinctively reply: we do. The British people own the British Isles. This is a democracy, isn't it? But the facts tell a different story. When you look at a map of the British Isles, you are looking not at your home but at a land mass overwhelmingly owned by a tiny aristocratic elite. Extraordinary though it might seem, in the 21st century, 0.6 per cent of the British people own 69 per cent of the land on which we live - and they are mostly the same families who owned it in the 19th century.

When it comes to land ownership, Britain today is a more unequal country than Brazil - where there are regular land riots. We are beaten in the European league tables only by Spain, a country which largely retains the land patterns imposed by General Franco's fascist regime. It's time we realised: this land is not your land, from Land's End to the Scottish Highlands. It is theirs.


this quote is from:
http://comment.independent.co.uk/columnists_a_l/johann_hari/article10847.ece

DominicJ
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Post: #109931 DominicJ
Mon Jun 16, 2008 1:58 pm

I'm pretty sure even the NT owns more than 2% of the land, HMG definatly does, so since they arent people, theres no way 2% of the people own 98% of the land.

Statistics like that are almost certainly rubbish if they add up to 100%, 7% of the populace owning 84% of the land in the early 70's sounds much more reasonable.

Frankly, the reason land ownership hasnt changed is because a lot of land is effectivly worthless, primarily because of planning laws, are you going to buy a 10 acre parcel of land thats 25miles from the nearest road and cant be developed in anyway?
I certainly wouldnt.

Its a little hypocritical to demand you can build whatever you want on your land, but T***o cant on theirs.

Personaly, I think you should be able to do whatever you want on land you own, but that would take a lot more sacrifice on the part of the NIMBY's and the Greens than other people.
But hey, I'm a libertarian, when did we ever get agreed with
I'm not a hippie, I'm a realist.
I think everyones English

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Planning permission

Post: #110405 Bluebell
Tue Jun 17, 2008 8:40 pm

Hi
Been reading the threads with interest. We have been told that we can site and station a caravan on our land but that it is only to supplement agricultural use i.e. for eating, showering etc and occasional stay overs. The land is not residential so we cannot live in the caravan as a residence. Its taken a bit of battling to get this far but now we know we can have one we would like a good sized static but are worried that we will be told to remove it. Does anyone know if a static fulfils the definition of a caravan given that most of them do have wheels underneath ?
Thanks
Bluebell :flower:
Happiness is wanting what you have.

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Re: Planning permission

Post: #110652 caithnesscrofter
Fri Jun 20, 2008 5:28 pm

Bluebell wrote:Hi
Been reading the threads with interest. We have been told that we can site and station a caravan on our land but that it is only to supplement agricultural use i.e. for eating, showering etc and occasional stay overs. The land is not residential so we cannot live in the caravan as a residence. Its taken a bit of battling to get this far but now we know we can have one we would like a good sized static but are worried that we will be told to remove it. Does anyone know if a static fulfils the definition of a caravan given that most of them do have wheels underneath ?
Thanks
Bluebell :flower:


Yes. Tis a caravan. Refer to the Caravans Act. It gives you an idea of the letter of the law concerning this issue. The law is that any moveable structure designed to be lived in is classed as a caravan under the act. However, tents, tentlike structures (ie. yurts, tipis, benders) and railway carriages are exempt under the act.

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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #110686 Bluebell
Fri Jun 20, 2008 7:29 pm

Thank you so much. Have consulted the Act now and think we might be safe.
We'll get on with it now. :sunny:
Happiness is wanting what you have.

wiggy
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #112725 wiggy
Tue Jul 01, 2008 9:26 am

Interesting reading this thread as I have similar ideas.
I am in process of selling my house to fund all of this.
How I am sorting it is to buy my land, put a 2-3 bed static on it, use gennie, solar, wind etc for power, [off grid but do have water]. We will be using compost loo's. I plan to have chickens, ducks etc, couple sheep, goats, pigs, grow lots fruit and veg, be sefl sufficient as possible.
I also would like to have an area to rent out tents so that people can see how an eco friendly site is laid out and we can share ideas and ideals [but that wont be our first priority as it will take time to get set up].
Now the problem is that we cant stay on the land for more than 28 days a year in our agricultural workers rest room/office!
So we have looked at buying a 2nd static [or decent sized tourer] on a caravan site that we can 'use' as our main address and its under 10 miles from our land - there fore we will not be homeless, we will have a main address and the field to use and the long term plan is that when we have proven we can be self sufficinet and benefit the area, we will then consider puting in for PP so that we can live in the static. We are NOT interested in building a house in any way shape or form, we would be interested in maybe a yurt or two though in the future!
This would be our way round the planning permission nightmare, unless its too simplistic and anyone knows better..................................

Esther.R
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #113368 Esther.R
Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:34 pm

Something that hasn't really come up in this debate, or not fully, is where people want to build. Under most local plans building is much more likely to be granted permission on a brownfield site rather than a greenfield site. But few eco-friendly developments have the inclination or the finances to compete with a supermarket chain to buy up a brownfield site where planning might be easier to obtain. The places that tend to be chosen are attractive rural sites which are the worst to get planning permission on as they are protected to maintain this rural situation, plus it is important to maintain good pasture land for agricultural purposes, which is why planning is easier to obtain for agricultural buildings in rural areas than it is for private housing.

Rezzo
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #117351 Rezzo
Thu Jul 31, 2008 2:29 pm

wiggy wrote:Interesting reading this thread as I have similar ideas.
I am in process of selling my house to fund all of this.
How I am sorting it is to buy my land, put a 2-3 bed static on it, use gennie, solar, wind etc for power, [off grid but do have water]. We will be using compost loo's. I plan to have chickens, ducks etc, couple sheep, goats, pigs, grow lots fruit and veg, be sefl sufficient as possible.
I also would like to have an area to rent out tents so that people can see how an eco friendly site is laid out and we can share ideas and ideals [but that wont be our first priority as it will take time to get set up].
Now the problem is that we cant stay on the land for more than 28 days a year in our agricultural workers rest room/office!
So we have looked at buying a 2nd static [or decent sized tourer] on a caravan site that we can 'use' as our main address and its under 10 miles from our land - there fore we will not be homeless, we will have a main address and the field to use and the long term plan is that when we have proven we can be self sufficinet and benefit the area, we will then consider puting in for PP so that we can live in the static. We are NOT interested in building a house in any way shape or form, we would be interested in maybe a yurt or two though in the future!
This would be our way round the planning permission nightmare, unless its too simplistic and anyone knows better..................................


I love the idea of an eco residential park, with eco statics, yurts, cabins etc. My idea of paradise.

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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #117422 Ratty
Thu Jul 31, 2008 9:15 pm

You'd probably love this place then http://www.coedhills.co.uk/. My good friend Mike is the Low Impact Architect who works with them :mrgreen:
:flower: Ratty

http://shop.ebay.co.uk/merchant/in_memory_of_joeb - Raising money for charity selling lots of things! Please take a look!

Image

Rezzo
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #117732 Rezzo
Sat Aug 02, 2008 1:10 pm

Thanks for pointing this out, I'd not heard of Coed Hills before.

I like the sound of the Low Impact Building & permaculture courses :flower:

ina
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #119148 ina
Tue Aug 12, 2008 10:22 pm

Heard this mentioned on the radio the other day - and it's looking very interesting and helpful, especially for those of us who are hoping to somehow have somewhere to live on the land one of the days!


http://www.tlio.org.uk/TheLand/index.html
Ina
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wiggy
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Re: Buying some land and living on it.

Post: #121013 wiggy
Tue Aug 26, 2008 7:03 pm

Interesting reading the posts, ive nt logged on for a while.
Well, we have been busy, thought we had some land in cornwall, but it proved to be too heavy soil, very 'clay'y' and hard to work, so we had to pull out of this.
Seen a good patch in somerset, but this is up for auction with 6 other fields and we wouldnt be able to gauge our 'neighbours' and the reaction to having us living on a field - the 'neighbours' may try to buy the lot and could therefore make life difficult for us if they did not want us parked in the middle of 'their' land.
Unless anyone wants to buy the other feilds..........................
We would be interested in joining forces with more like minded people and putting a fair sum of money into buying suitable land, if someone knows where such land is to be found!
Or if someone knows of land that is nicely hidden, good soil, has water on site, and for sale, but cannot buy it, we would be interested in buying it and allowing that person to live on the site.
God, am I sounding desperate?


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