Rusty tools

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Rusty tools

Post: # 277929Post sda »

I've got some rusty tools - screwdriver, pliers, etc. If if put them in some vinegar, will the rust flake off?

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 277931Post old tree man »

We have used fizzy cola on old tools befor with great results :flower:
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 277943Post Skippy »

If you use a bit of wire wool and rub the vinegar into the surface then the rust will disappear much better assuming it's just surface rust. Don't forget to rub them over with a light oil afterwards to stop them rusting up again.


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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 277960Post sda »

I used vinegar and it worked a treat - soaked in vinegar for a day, then went over them with stainless steel scrubbie, rinsed in water with bicarb (I heard it was necessary to neutralise them :? ), wiped them dry, warmed to ensure dryness and a spray with some oil - even the handles were cleaned with it. I'd say they were almost as good as new if they hadn't been old ones given to me by a friend!

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287859Post Weedo »

I know this is an old post but I will add it my bit. Since taking over the farm and cleaning 3 generations worth of clutter from the garage and sheds, I have accumulated a number of very old and very rusty tools that I want to salvage - some for interest and others because the type and quality can no longer be found. Several now reside in the back of the ute and see regular service.

For really rusty tools etc. I have found the best solution is 1 part molasses dissolved in 2 parts hot water - soak the tool entirely for 2-3 days then rub down with fine steel wool (the type you buy in painters or restoration shops). Some items may need a second bath. After cleaning and drying keep a light coat of oil on them.

If they have a wooden handle, wash the handle with warm water and ordinary dish washing liquid, allow to dry and then use a light wood oil such as cedar oil.

if storing for an extended period then coat the metal parts with raw Linseed oil and allow to air dry before storing. But (there is always a but) the Linseed oil will harden over time and may be hard to get off after a couple of years.

To avoid - anything harsh that will penetrate the metal surface - coarse emery papers, coarse steel wool, powered wire brushes and corrosive liquids. Try to avoid using modern engine oils on tools, they commonly contain a range of added chemicals and detergents.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287868Post Green Aura »

I suppose it's the high sugar content that does it - so either molasses (is that golden syrup over here - it is what Americans call molasses, I'm not sure about Australia) or cola would do a similar job.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287883Post Brewtrog »

Green Aura wrote: cola would do a similar job.
Big part of why cola works is the phosphoric acid content. I know I've cleaned rust off something with my no-rinse steriliser (primarily phosphoric acid)

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287932Post Weedo »

Hi

No, in Australia molasses is the thick, black rich stuff often used for a cattle feed suppliment (mixed with urea) in drought and golden syrup is a light, golden coloured syrup used much more for people consumption. I use the "raw" molasses, not the refined type sold in health food shops - you could possibly get this from horse feed suppliers? I get it in 200l drums for the cattle

Americans mis-name everything.

I suspect the quick fermentation process is the key as the mix starts to bubble in a few hours.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287940Post nickholden »

molasses or Black treacle can be got in tins at T***o very good in cakes

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 287941Post nickholden »

that is tes co's

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 293442Post Viper254 »

I know it's a prehistoric post, but I've recently found a prehistoric set of shears and a selection of other ancient tools in my tumbledown boiler house.

I'm going to see if the shears can be revitalised - I had put them on the bonfire pile so I could just give the metal to the scrappie, but I'm feeling inspired now.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 293443Post Green Aura »

Sounds like a good idea. We've got a really old pair of shears that have outlasted several newer ones. The hinge always seems to go but the old ones chug along sturdily.

New handles might be an issue, but if you can source/make those cleaning them up and getting an edge shouldn't be too bad.

We've just bought a couple of hand drills and bits from Fleabay and cleaned them up - so much more robust than any new ones we've seen.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 293446Post Viper254 »

Green Aura wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 1:02 pm
Sounds like a good idea. We've got a really old pair of shears that have outlasted several newer ones. The hinge always seems to go but the old ones chug along sturdily.

New handles might be an issue, but if you can source/make those cleaning them up and getting an edge shouldn't be too bad.

We've just bought a couple of hand drills and bits from Fleabay and cleaned them up - so much more robust than any new ones we've seen.
The handles that are on there may still be OK.

That sounds good - your post triggered my brain and I went out there this lunch time. I can't clear it because it's got hedgehogs hibernating in there (the whole place collapsed on itself probably 30 or so years ago) but I've looked at some of the bits of what I had assumed was pipe on the floor - they're giant drill bits so I'll have a go at those as well.

So far it's also turned up a big hammer; what's the short-handled version of a sledgehammer called? I've got a shovel as well - that's on the bonfire to remove the remains of the handle so I can re-handle it.

Parafin roadworker's lamp also found, but that was rotten through sadly, and a pickaxe that can be re-handled.
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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 293447Post Odsox »

Viper254 wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 1:02 pm
what's the short-handled version of a sledgehammer called?
Club Hammer, although some people call it a Lump Hammer
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Disclaimer: I almost certainly haven't a clue what I'm talking about.

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Re: Rusty tools

Post: # 293448Post Weedo »

careful with the bonfire Viper, too much heat and you can destroy the temper on old tools, particularly the edged ones as the cutting edge is very fine and overheats easily in even a small fire; best to drill the old handle out.

Another more "techy" rust removal process I am trying is electrolysis - a plastic or glass container of water, some Sodium Carbonate - about 1 Tsp per litre (not bi-carb) a piece of scrap iron as a sacrifice electrode (anode) and a battery charger (the cheap ones as the higher spec ones automatically cut out in this process). The anode should be long enough to be partly out of the solution (or suspended in it using steel wire); suspend the rusty tool (cathode) in the solution, also using steel wire - make sure the tool does not touch the container or anode. Hook up the battery charger - positive to the sacrifice anode, negative to the tool (important to get this right) turn on the power - you should see bubbles coming off both the anode and cathode.
Leave a couple of hours, wash off in clean water and clean up with wire brush etc.

The advantage of this is that it gets to every part including the bits you can't reach. I have a box of old planes, spoke shaves etc that went under a flood about 15 years ago and were never dried out so are rusted solid (can't even get the screws undone) - I will be trying it on these
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